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Celebrating Habitat Month

July 01, 2024

Join us in celebrating Habitat Month 2024! Learn more about how NOAA Fisheries' Office of Habitat Conservation is working to restore habitat to support fisheries, protected species, and coastal communities.

Graphic celebrating Habitat Month showing the dark blue outlines of a bird, a school of fish, and seagrass.

We are excited to kick off Habitat Month! All month long, we will share amazing habitat conservation efforts through our website and social media. The theme this year is "Habitat for All.”  We will focus on how the Office of Habitat Conservation is working together with our partners to protect and restore healthy habitats across the country. Through inclusive partnerships, we aim to ensure that these vital ecosystems continue to support diverse species and coastal and Great Lakes communities for generations to come. 

Follow us here and on X (formerly Twitter) (@NOAAHabitat, #HabitatMonth). Also, be sure to stay up-to-date by subscribing to HabitatNews. Help spread the word about the importance of habitat conservation in making an impact for coastal ecosystems and communities.

Habitat Features

Meet Chemine Jackels, Marine Habitat Specialist for the NOAA Restoration Center

Chemine works as a Technical Monitor supporting habitat restoration projects in the Pacific Northwest.

Read about Chemine's work

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a women in a blue shirt stands on a rock with 2 white dogs on leashes
Chemine with her two dogs on the South Fork of the Snoqualmie River in Western Washington. Photo: Chemine Jackels/NOAA Fisheries.

Restoring New Orleans Wetlands After Hurricane Katrina

New Orleans' wetlands and bayous are essential to the city's identity, but have been severely degraded over time. Learn about new federal funding that will kickstart efforts to involve communities in restoring them.

Listen to the podcast

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New Orlean's Lower Ninth Ward after Hurricane Katrina
New Orlean's Lower Ninth Ward after Hurricane Katrina (Photo: National Wildlife Federation)

Oyster Reef Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay: We're Making Significant Progress

Together with partners in Maryland and Virginia, we're working to restore oyster reef habitat around the Chesapeake Bay. We're making great progress toward our goal to restore reefs in 10 tributaries by the end of 2025.

Learn about oyster reef restoration in the Chesapeake Bay

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Healthy oysters growing into a reef in the Chesapeake Bay
Healthy oysters grow into reefs that provide habitat and support a community.

Ambitious Living Shoreline Project Combats Coastal Land Loss in South Carolina

With $6.8 million from NOAA, The Nature Conservancy will build a 2,000-foot-long living shoreline near Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort. The organization will also help low-income landowners implement living shorelines on their properties.

Read the full story

Volunteers building an oyster castle living shoreline reef near Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort (Photo: Lance Cpl. Kyle Baskin/U.S. Marine Corps)
Volunteers building an oyster castle living shoreline reef near Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort (Photo: Lance Cpl. Kyle Baskin/U.S. Marine Corps)

Supporting the Long-Term Survival of Copper River Salmon and Alaska Native Traditions

With $4.3 million in NOAA funds, the Copper River Watershed Project and The Eyak Corporation will remove fish passage barriers, opening more streams for salmon spawning and subsistence fishing.

Read about the fish passage projects

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Eyak Tribal Member Tiffany Beedle holding a 35-pound King (Chinook) salmon she processed for the Native Village of Eyak Subsistence program. (Photo: Tiffany Beedle)
Eyak Tribal Member Tiffany Beedle holding a 35-pound King (Chinook) salmon she processed for the Native Village of Eyak Subsistence program. (Photo: Tiffany Beedle)

Fish Passage Facility Restores Access to 1,000 Miles of Habitat in North Carolina

Updates at the Blewett Falls Hydroelectric Project now allow American eel and other fish to access previously blocked upstream riverine habitat.

Upgrades to fish passage facilities

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Skinny dark-colored eels in a white collection tank
Migrating American eel being weighed after using the Blewett Falls Dam eelway. These juveniles (called elvers) used the newly constructed eelway to move upstream and will be passed into habitat above the dam where they will continue to grow. Credit: Justin Dycus/Duke Energy

Middle Peninsula’s Marshes and Living Shorelines Generate More than $6.4 Million Annually in Economic Value

Living shorelines and marshes in the Middle Peninsula Habitat Focus Area support more than $6.4 million each year in economic value from recreational fishing. That’s more than three and a half times the value generated by hardened shorelines in the area. 

Economic value of Middle Peninsula's marshes and living shorelines

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Marshes, living shorelines, and hardened shorelines are some of the types of shorelines found along the Middle Peninsula of Virginia. Photo: Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program with aerial support by Southwings.
Marshes, living shorelines, and hardened shorelines are some of the types of shorelines found along the Middle Peninsula of Virginia. Photo: Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program with aerial support by Southwings.

GulfCorps Brings Ecosystem Recovery to the Gulf Coast

Mobilizing community youth to create resilient coasts and communities in the five Gulf States.

GulfCorps Conservation Corps program

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Eleven people standing in a line passing down bags of oyster shells from the back of a pickup truck on a white sandy beach
GulfCorps crew members from the Conservation Corps of the Forgotten Coast build oyster reefs to protect eroding shorelines in Florida. Credit: Mike Dumas/The Nature Conservancy

Dredged Material Placement at Pierce Marsh is Complete

NOAA worked with partners to restore 115 acres of intertidal marsh in Pierce Marsh in West Galveston Bay, Texas.

Read about the restoration project

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Drone shot image of the Pierce Marsh restoration cell completed in early 2024. The vegetated portion of the cell was completed in January 2022, and the bare sediments of the cell were placed in early 2024.
Drone shot image of the Pierce Marsh restoration cell completed in early 2024. The vegetated portion of the cell was completed in January 2022, and the bare sediments of the cell were placed in early 2024. Credit: Michael Plaza/Ducks Unlimited

Habitat Videos, Podcasts, and Story Maps

Video: The Science of RestorationGood Salmon Habitat Works

Research proves restoring habitat works for salmon. 

Watch the video

Podcast: Restoring the Klamath River BasinThe Largest Dam Removal Project in the World

How the restoration of the Klamath watershed, the largest dam removal project in the world, will reopen access to habitat for the threatened and endangered native fish of the area.

Listen to the podcast

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The Klamath River mouth. Credit: Thomas Dunklin
The Klamath River mouth. Credit: Thomas Dunklin

Story Map: The Past, Present and Future of Restoration in Washington’s Commencement Bay

A new story map explores the industrial past of a busy Tacoma, Washington harbor, and the restoration activities shaping its ecological future.

View the story map

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Chinook salmon jump in frothy white water
Chinook salmon jump in frothy white water. Credit: Laura Mahoney/USFWS