Ocean Futures Under Ocean Acidification, Marine Protection, and Changing Fishing Pressures Explored Using a Worldwide Suite of Ecosystem Models

Scientists from Norway, the United States, France, and Australia evaluated the effects of ocean acidification, marine protected areas, and fishing pressure on eight different marine ecosystems.

Sea turtle swims above coral reef at Baker Island

Sea turtle swims above coral reef at Baker Island (Photo: NOAA Fisheries/Paula Ayotte).

 

Ecosystem-based management of the ocean considers all impacts on and uses of marine and coastal systems. In recent years, there has been a heightened interest in ecosystem-based management tools that test different management options and help identify tradeoffs among human uses. End-to-end ecosystem models, that consider a wide range of management options, are a way of providing integrated solutions to complex ocean management problems. This international study leverages advances in ecosystem modeling to explore common opportunities and challenges for ecosystem-based management on a global scale.

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Olsen E, Kaplan IC, Ainsworth C, Fay G, Gaichas S, Gamble R, Girardin R, Eide CH, Ihde TF, Morzaria-Luna HN, Johnson KF, Savina-Rolland M, Townsend H, Weijerman M, Fulton EA, Link JS. Ocean Futures Under Ocean Acidification, Marine Protection, and Changing Fishing Pressures Explored Using a Worldwide Suite of Ecosystem Models. (Published in Frontiers in Marine Science).

Last updated by Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center on 06/18/2018