Short Citation:
Southwest Fisheries Science Center, 2021: Distribution, growth, and condition of salmonids in the central California Current Ecosystem., https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/inport/item/29801.

Item Identification

Title: Distribution, growth, and condition of salmonids in the central California Current Ecosystem.
Short Name: Ocean Salmon Survey
Status: Completed
Creation Date: 1998
Revision Date: 2016
Abstract:

The Fisheries Ecology Division of NOAA’s SWFSC conducted annual surveys of salmon and their ocean habitat in the coastal waters of northern California and southern Oregon from 1998-2016. We used a surface trawl to collect juvenile and subadult salmonids, including several ESA-listed populations of Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead. We also quantified other coastal pelagic fish and invertebrates that co-occur with salmon, and we measured spatially matched biological and physical oceanographic variables. Juvenile salmon were frozen at sea and transported back to shore for further analysis. Scales, DNA, otoliths, stomach contents, blood plasma, and implanted tags (if present) were retained. The majority of older salmon and bycatch species were released alive at sea. Additional data recorded during our survey included seabird counts, plankton samples, echosounder readings, and CTD profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll, transmissivity, and PAR.

Purpose:

The broad objective of this project was to measure the spatial distribution and physiological condition of salmonid stocks, including ESA-listed and non-listed populations, in the central portion of the California Current Ecosystem. Additionally, we measured oceanographic conditions and nekton community structure and related salmon abundance, migration, and condition factors to ocean habitat.

Notes:

The raw data from this project are stored on desktop computers and servers at the FED laboratory in Santa Cruz, California. Available data formats are Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, and SQL. The original paper datasheets used to record data at sea are all still available and stored in archives at the SWFSC FED lab.

Keywords

Theme Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
None California Current ecosystem
None coastal oceanography
None community structure
None nekton
None plankton
None rope trawl
None salmon
None salmon ecology

Physical Location

Organization: Southwest Fisheries Science Center
City: Santa Cruz
State/Province: CA
Country: USA

Data Set Information

Data Set Scope Code: Data Set
Data Set Type: SQL Server Database, Excel spreadsheets
Maintenance Frequency: As Needed
Data Presentation Form: database

Support Roles

Data Steward

CC ID: 264646
Date Effective From: 2005
Date Effective To:
Contact (Person): Harding, Jeff
Address: 110 McAllister Way
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
USA
Email Address: Jeff.Harding@noaa.gov
Phone: (831) 420-3938
Fax: (831) 420-3977
Business Hours: M-F 8:30-17:00
Contact Instructions:

contact via email

Distributor

CC ID: 264647
Date Effective From: 2005
Date Effective To:
Contact (Organization): Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC)
Address: 8901 La Jolla Shores Dr.
La Jolla, CA 92037
USA
Phone: (858)546-7000
URL: http://swfsc.noaa.gov/
Business Hours: 8:00-16:30

Metadata Contact

CC ID: 264648
Date Effective From: 2005
Date Effective To:
Contact (Person): Harding, Jeff
Address: 110 McAllister Way
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
USA
Email Address: Jeff.Harding@noaa.gov
Phone: (831) 420-3938
Fax: (831) 420-3977
Business Hours: M-F 8:30-17:00
Contact Instructions:

contact via email

Point of Contact

CC ID: 264380
Date Effective From: 2010
Date Effective To:
Contact (Person): Harding, Jeff
Address: 110 McAllister Way
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
USA
Email Address: Jeff.Harding@noaa.gov
Phone: (831) 420-3938
Fax: (831) 420-3977
Business Hours: M-F 8:30-17:00
Contact Instructions:

Contact Jeff via email at: jeff.harding@noaa.gov

Extents

Extent Group 1

Extent Group 1 / Geographic Area 1

CC ID: 264382
W° Bound: -125
E° Bound: -120
N° Bound: 42
S° Bound: 36
Description

Northern California

Extent Group 1 / Time Frame 1

CC ID: 264383
Time Frame Type: Continuing
Start: 2010

Access Information

Security Class: Unclassified
Data Access Procedure:

Contact Jeff Harding for direct access via ODBC to the database.

Data Access Constraints:

None

Data Use Constraints:

None

Distribution Information

Distribution 1

CC ID: 264649
Download URL: http://128.114.3.187
Distributor: Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) (2005 - Present)
File Name: ocean_salmon_ecology database
Description:

sql server database

File Type: SPREADSHEET (MICROSOFT EXCEL)

Technical Environment

Description:

Data reside on an SQL Server 2008 database.

Data Quality

Representativeness:

Our coastal ocean survey was based on samples collected annually at a small number of stations (60-80 fixed, predetermined locations at sea). Most stations were visited only once or twice per year, usually without repeated or replicate sampling on any given cruise. Our study area was large: appx. 750 km north to south, with widely spaced transect lines running from appx. 2 to 30 km out from shore. Therefore, our study design provided a long time series of coarse-grained snapshots of general ocean conditions (biological and physical) over many years. Due to the large distances between stations, the lack of replication, and the infrequency of cruises, the accuracy and precision of our population size estimates are low to moderate (the confidence intervals are large), however the effort employed to obtain these data is highly comparable to most other biological surveys of this type conducted by large research ships at sea. The accuracy and precision of physiological data obtained from the specimens themselves is higher, because most stations yielded numerous individual specimens (i.e. we have replicate samples and higher statistical power). The accuracy and precision of physical measurements is high, because the instruments themselves are accurate, reliable, and calibrated regularly.

Accuracy:

As mentioned above, the accuracy of some biological data from this survey is low to moderate. Due to the large distances between sampling points, the lack of replication, and the long intervals between sampling (usually just one or two cruises per year), the confidence intervals on population size estimates are large. These data would probably not be sufficiently accurate to estimate a true population size for any of the species sampled. However, this was never the goal of the study. The sampling effort and protocols were highly consistent among years, and the data can be used appropriately to detect interannual trends (increasing, decreasing, or stable) and broad spatial patterns of abundance. The accuracy of physiological data is higher, because individual stations often yielded many specimens, providing replication and allowing for better estimates of statistical parameters, such as means and standard deviations.

Bias:

Some level of bias is unavoidable in any study of this kind. For example, the catchability of different species by rope trawl and plankton nets varies depending on the size and swimming ability of the target animals, the mesh size and tow speed of the net through the water, sea conditions, and variation among vessels, captains, and crews. Bias was minimized by consistent use of the same sampling gears and operating protocols throughout the survey.

Comparability:

Our trawl nets and other sampling equipment is standard issue for numerous research surveys of this kind. We report catch abundance in standardized units (CPUE) allowing for limited comparisons even to other surveys using different gear types. Our laboratory analytical techniques are well described in the scientific literature and they are similar or identical to those used by other researchers in this field. Our instruments are commonly used standard tools for this field.

Completeness Measure:

We completed most of our sampling activities as planned. We obtained a sufficient number of specimens (e.g. numbers of juvenile salmon, number of water samples, number of DNA samples) to conduct all planned laboratory analyses. On occasion, sampling stations were dropped due to unfavorable sea conditions. In some years (e.g. 2006, 2008, 2009) lack of funding and no allocation of sea time on research vessels caused gaps in the time series.,We completed most of our sampling activities as planned. We obtained a sufficient number of specimens (e.g numbers of juvenile salmon, number of water samples, number of DNA samples) to conduct all planned laboratory analyses. On occasion, sampling stations were dropped due to unfavorable sea conditions. In some years (e.g. 2006, 2008, 2009) lack of available sea time on research vessels caused gaps in the time series.

Precision:

Due to general limitations on available ship time and days at sea, we did not usually conduct replicate trawls at individual stations, therefore our ability to measure the precision of population estimates with standard statistical tests is limited. Instrumentation used at sea (CTD profilers, EK60 sonars) was calibrated and tested regularly, and is considered accurate and precise. Physiological data were obtained under controlled, consistent laboratory conditions using carefully frozen or preserved specimens. Statistical measures of precision are presented, whenever possible, in our published research findings.

Analytical Precision:

Analytical precision is generally high because measurements were made in controlled laboratory conditions using industry-standard equipment (e.g. scientific balances, flame-ion lipid chromatograms, etc.).

Field Precision:

Due to general limitations on available ship time and days at sea, we did not usually conduct replicate trawls at individual stations, therefore our ability to measure the precision of population estimates with standard statistical tests is limited. Instruments used to measure physical oceanographic properties at sea (CTD profilers, EK60 sonars, water filters) were calibrated and tested regularly, and these data are considered accurate and precise.

Completeness Report:

Information about omissions, selection criteria, generalization, definitions used, and other rules used to derive the data sets can be found in our published research findings.

Quality Control Procedures Employed:

Data are collected at sea and recorded on paper datasheets by observers, or recorded directly to digital data files in the case of electronic instruments. Back on shore, paper datasheets are transcribed to computer files. All data files are proofread and checked for errors and completeness. Final versions are error-free.

Data Management

Have Resources for Management of these Data Been Identified?: Yes
Approximate Percentage of Budget for these Data Devoted to Data Management: Unknown
Do these Data Comply with the Data Access Directive?: Yes
Is Access to the Data Limited Based on an Approved Waiver?: No
Approximate Delay Between Data Collection and Dissemination: 1 year
If Delay is Longer than Latency of Automated Processing, Indicate Under What Authority Data Access is Delayed:

Data checking and loading into final database.

Actual or Planned Long-Term Data Archive Location: To Be Determined
If To Be Determined, Unable to Archive, or No Archiving Intended, Explain:

Awaiting guidance from headquarters.

Approximate Delay Between Data Collection and Archiving: 1 year
How Will the Data Be Protected from Accidental or Malicious Modification or Deletion Prior to Receipt by the Archive?:

Data is backed up weekly and stored in a secure location.

Lineage

Lineage Statement:

Data are collected at sea and recorded on paper datasheets by observers, or recorded directly to digital data files in the case of electronic instruments. Back on shore, paper datasheets are transcribed to computer files. All data files are proofread and checked for errors and completeness. Final versions are error-free.

Sources

Regional and seasonal patterns of epipelagic fish assemblages from the central California Current

CC ID: 866857
Contact Role Type: Originator
Contact Type: Person
Contact Name: Jeffrey Harding
Extent Type: Range
Extent Start Date/Time: 2000
Extent End Date/Time: 2005
Citation URL: https://spo.nmfs.noaa.gov/sites/default/files/pdf-content/2011/1093/harding.pdf
Citation URL Name: unknown

Process Steps

Process Step 1

CC ID: 264394
Description:

Data are collected at sea and recorded on paper datasheets by observers, or recorded directly to digital data files in the case of electronic instruments.

Process Contact: Harding, Jeff
Phone (Voice): (831) 420-3938
Email Address: Jeff.Harding@noaa.gov

Process Step 2

CC ID: 264395
Description:

Back on shore, paper datasheets are transcribed to computer files. All data files are proofread and checked for errors and completeness. Final versions are error-free.

Process Contact: Harding, Jeff
Phone (Voice): (831) 420-3938
Email Address: Jeff.Harding@noaa.gov

Process Step 3

CC ID: 866837
Description:

In the case of laboratory analyses of specimens or samples previously collected at sea, examinations or instruments are used to obtain data. Examination data are initially recorded on paper, then entered to computer files and proof-read for accuracy and completeness. Data from digital instruments are usually transferred directly to computer storage files and checked for accuracy.

Process Contact: Harding, Jeff
Phone (Voice): (831) 420-3938
Email Address: Jeff.Harding@noaa.gov

Catalog Details

Catalog Item ID: 29801
Metadata Record Created By: Don Pearson
Metadata Record Created: 2015-12-15 16:14+0000
Metadata Record Last Modified By: SysAdmin InPortAdmin
Metadata Record Last Modified: 2019-08-07 11:09+0000
Metadata Record Published: 2015-12-22
Owner Org: SWFSC
Metadata Publication Status: Published Externally
Do Not Publish?: N
Metadata Next Review Date: 2016-12-22