Maintenance Notice: Thursday February 29 @ 1pm-2:30pm Eastern. InPort and its associated services will be under maintenance and unavailable for the deployment of InPort Release 5.3.4. Downtime Schedule Thursday, February 29, 2024 1:00pm - 2:30pm Eastern / 10:00am - 11:30am Pacific / 8:00am - 9:30am Hawaii Impacted Areas - InPort Website: https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/inport - In...
View All
Search Help Show/Hide Menu
Summary
Item Identification
Data Attributes
Catalog Details

Summary

Abstract

The data layer ESI contains arc (Complete Chain) features for the ESI shoreline classification and is based on Environmental Sensitivity Index Guidelines, Version 2.0 (Halls, J., J. Michel, S. Zengel, J. Dahlin, and J. Petersen, 1997, Hazardous Materials Response and Assessment Division, NOAA). The ESI classification was performed in February 1997. | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Entity Information

Data Attribute / Type Description
ESI
VARCHAR
The intertidal coastal habitats of Golfo de Fonseca were mapped during overflights and ground surveys conducted in February, 2000. Overflights were conducted using fixed-wing Cessna 152 and 172s. Surveys of the entire study area were conducted at flying altitudes of 400-600 feet (120-185 meters) and at a slow air speed. During this work, an experienced coastal geologist delineated the intertidal shoreline habitats directly onto 1:50,000-scale topographic maps. Where appropriate, multiple habitats were described for each shoreline segment. Prior to the overflights, high resolution, black and white vertical aerial photographs (obtained in December, 1998 under the USGS Open Skies Program) were examined to produce an initial classification. The overflights and ground surveys were particularly important in updating the location and extent of recent aquaculture sites, as well as delineating changes resulting from Hurricane Mitch (October, 1998). Polygonal features, such as mangroves and salt flats, were initially mapped from the existing topographic maps, updated through the aerial photography, and finalized during the overflights. To identify and classify the various coastal habitats, the following factors were integrated: 1) Shoreline type (substrate, grain size, tidal elevation, origin); 2) Exposure to wave and tidal energy; 3) Biological communities. The resulting coastal classification groups a complex series of coastal habitats into ten generalized habitat categories (some with more than one sub-type). The physical characterization of the generalized categories is based on geomorphology and the division of the coastal habitats according to their physical stability, dynamic character, or sheltered nature. From the physical standpoint, the more stable habitats include the rocky headlands and wave-cut platforms; the dynamic or continuously evolving habitats include the full range of beach types (sand to gravel) and exposed tidal flats; and the sheltered habitats include mangrove stands, sheltered flats, and salt marshes. Biological characterization of the generalized habitat categories incorporates the different ecological communities that are associated with them. Examples of these include encrusting fauna and flora on rocky headlands, and coastal birds, burrowing bivalves, and annelids associated with tidal flats. The combination of the physical and biological features results in the definition of the final generalized habitat category. Human use and potential development of these coastal habitats must take into account the physical and biological characteristics of these categories. The categories are: 1A) Exposed Rocky Cliffs; 1B) Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures; 2A) Exposed Wave-cut Platforms in Bedrock; 3A) Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches; 4) Coarse-grained Sand Beaches; 5) Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches; 6A) Gravel Beaches; 6B) Riprap; 7) Exposed Tidal Flats; 8A) Sheltered Rocky Shores; 8B) Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures; 8C) Sheltered Riprap; 9A) Sheltered Tidal Flats; 9C) Hypersaline Tidal Flats; 10A) Salt and Brackish Water Marsh; 10C) Tall Mangroves; 10D) Short Mangroves. In many cases, the shorelines are also ranked with multiple codes, such as 6A/7. The first number is the most landward shoreline type (6A=gravel beach), with exposed tidal flats (7) being the shoreline type closest to the water. | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.
LINE
VARCHAR
Type of geographic feature | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.
SOURCE_ID
VARCHAR
Data source for the ESI | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.
ENVIR
VARCHAR
Regional environment | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Child Items

No Child Items for this record.

Contact Information

No contact information is available for this record.

Please contact the owner organization (ORR) for inquiries on this record.

Item Identification

Title: Complete Chain
Short Name: Complete Chain
Status: Completed
Abstract:

The data layer ESI contains arc (Complete Chain) features for the ESI shoreline classification and is based on Environmental Sensitivity Index Guidelines, Version 2.0 (Halls, J., J. Michel, S. Zengel, J. Dahlin, and J. Petersen, 1997, Hazardous Materials Response and Assessment Division, NOAA). The ESI classification was performed in February 1997. | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Notes:

Converted from FGDC using 'fgdc_to_inport_xml_entity.pl' script.

Data Attributes

Attribute Summary

Rubric Score Primary Key? Name Type Description
100
ESI VARCHAR The intertidal coastal habitats of Golfo de Fonseca were mapped during overflights and ground surveys conducted in February, 2000. Overflights were conducted using fixed-wing Cessna 152 and 172s. Surveys of the entire study area were conducted at flying altitudes of 400-600 feet (120-185 meters) and at a slow air speed. During this work, an experienced coastal geologist delineated the intertidal shoreline habitats directly onto 1:50,000-scale topographic maps. Where appropriate, multiple habitats were described for each shoreline segment. Prior to the overflights, high resolution, black and white vertical aerial photographs (obtained in December, 1998 under the USGS Open Skies Program) were examined to produce an initial classification. The overflights and ground surveys were particularly important in updating the location and extent of recent aquaculture sites, as well as delineating changes resulting from Hurricane Mitch (October, 1998). Polygonal features, such as mangroves and salt flats, were initially mapped from the existing topographic maps, updated through the aerial photography, and finalized during the overflights. To identify and classify the various coastal habitats, the following factors were integrated: 1) Shoreline type (substrate, grain size, tidal elevation, origin); 2) Exposure to wave and tidal energy; 3) Biological communities. The resulting coastal classification groups a complex series of coastal habitats into ten generalized habitat categories (some with more than one sub-type). The physical characterization of the generalized categories is based on geomorphology and the division of the coastal habitats according to their physical stability, dynamic character, or sheltered nature. From the physical standpoint, the more stable habitats include the rocky headlands and wave-cut platforms; the dynamic or continuously evolving habitats include the full range of beach types (sand to gravel) and exposed tidal flats; and the sheltered habitats include mangrove stands, sheltered flats, and salt marshes. Biological characterization of the generalized habitat categories incorporates the different ecological communities that are associated with them. Examples of these include encrusting fauna and flora on rocky headlands, and coastal birds, burrowing bivalves, and annelids associated with tidal flats. The combination of the physical and biological features results in the definition of the final generalized habitat category. Human use and potential development of these coastal habitats must take into account the physical and biological characteristics of these categories. The categories are: 1A) Exposed Rocky Cliffs; 1B) Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures; 2A) Exposed Wave-cut Platforms in Bedrock; 3A) Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches; 4) Coarse-grained Sand Beaches; 5) Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches; 6A) Gravel Beaches; 6B) Riprap; 7) Exposed Tidal Flats; 8A) Sheltered Rocky Shores; 8B) Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures; 8C) Sheltered Riprap; 9A) Sheltered Tidal Flats; 9C) Hypersaline Tidal Flats; 10A) Salt and Brackish Water Marsh; 10C) Tall Mangroves; 10D) Short Mangroves. In many cases, the shorelines are also ranked with multiple codes, such as 6A/7. The first number is the most landward shoreline type (6A=gravel beach), with exposed tidal flats (7) being the shoreline type closest to the water. | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.
100
LINE VARCHAR Type of geographic feature | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.
100
SOURCE_ID VARCHAR Data source for the ESI | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.
100
ENVIR VARCHAR Regional environment | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Attribute Details

ESI

CC ID: 542250
Seq. Order: 1
Data Storage Type: VARCHAR
Required: No
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

The intertidal coastal habitats of Golfo de Fonseca were mapped during overflights and ground surveys conducted in February, 2000. Overflights were conducted using fixed-wing Cessna 152 and 172s. Surveys of the entire study area were conducted at flying altitudes of 400-600 feet (120-185 meters) and at a slow air speed. During this work, an experienced coastal geologist delineated the intertidal shoreline habitats directly onto 1:50,000-scale topographic maps. Where appropriate, multiple habitats were described for each shoreline segment. Prior to the overflights, high resolution, black and white vertical aerial photographs (obtained in December, 1998 under the USGS Open Skies Program) were examined to produce an initial classification. The overflights and ground surveys were particularly important in updating the location and extent of recent aquaculture sites, as well as delineating changes resulting from Hurricane Mitch (October, 1998). Polygonal features, such as mangroves and salt flats, were initially mapped from the existing topographic maps, updated through the aerial photography, and finalized during the overflights. To identify and classify the various coastal habitats, the following factors were integrated: 1) Shoreline type (substrate, grain size, tidal elevation, origin); 2) Exposure to wave and tidal energy; 3) Biological communities. The resulting coastal classification groups a complex series of coastal habitats into ten generalized habitat categories (some with more than one sub-type). The physical characterization of the generalized categories is based on geomorphology and the division of the coastal habitats according to their physical stability, dynamic character, or sheltered nature. From the physical standpoint, the more stable habitats include the rocky headlands and wave-cut platforms; the dynamic or continuously evolving habitats include the full range of beach types (sand to gravel) and exposed tidal flats; and the sheltered habitats include mangrove stands, sheltered flats, and salt marshes. Biological characterization of the generalized habitat categories incorporates the different ecological communities that are associated with them. Examples of these include encrusting fauna and flora on rocky headlands, and coastal birds, burrowing bivalves, and annelids associated with tidal flats. The combination of the physical and biological features results in the definition of the final generalized habitat category. Human use and potential development of these coastal habitats must take into account the physical and biological characteristics of these categories. The categories are: 1A) Exposed Rocky Cliffs; 1B) Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures; 2A) Exposed Wave-cut Platforms in Bedrock; 3A) Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches; 4) Coarse-grained Sand Beaches; 5) Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches; 6A) Gravel Beaches; 6B) Riprap; 7) Exposed Tidal Flats; 8A) Sheltered Rocky Shores; 8B) Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures; 8C) Sheltered Riprap; 9A) Sheltered Tidal Flats; 9C) Hypersaline Tidal Flats; 10A) Salt and Brackish Water Marsh; 10C) Tall Mangroves; 10D) Short Mangroves. In many cases, the shorelines are also ranked with multiple codes, such as 6A/7. The first number is the most landward shoreline type (6A=gravel beach), with exposed tidal flats (7) being the shoreline type closest to the water. | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Allowed Values: 1A: Exposed Rocky Cliffs | 1A/2A: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures | 1A/2A/7: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 1A/3A/7: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 1A/4: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Coarse-grained Sand Beaches | 1A/4/7: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Coarse-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 1A/5: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches | 1A/5/7: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 1A/6A: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Gravel Beaches | 1A/6A/2A: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Gravel Beaches/ Exposed Wave-cut Platforms in Bedrock | 1A/6A/7: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Gravel Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 1A/7: Exposed Rocky Cliffs/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 1B: Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures | 1B/3A: Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures/ Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches | 1B/4: Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures/ Coarse-grained Sand Beaches | 1B/4/7: Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures/ Coarse-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 1B/5: Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures/ Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches | 1B/6A: Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures/ Gravel Beaches | 1B/7: Exposed, Solid Man-made Structures/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 2A: Exposed Wave-cut Platforms in Bedrock | 3A: Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches | 3A/7: Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 3A/9A: Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 4: Coarse-grained Sand Beaches | 4/7: Coarse-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 4/9A: Coarse-grained Sand Beaches/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 5: Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches | 5/6B: Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches/ Riprap | 5/7: Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 5/9A: Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 6A: Gravel Beaches | 6A/7: Gravel Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 6B: Riprap | 6B/4/7: Riprap/ Coarse-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 6B/5: Riprap/ Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches | 6B/6A: Riprap/ Gravel Beaches | 6B/9A: Riprap/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 8A: Sheltered Rocky Shores | 8A/9A: Sheltered Rocky Shores/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 8B: Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures | 8B/3A: Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures/ Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches | 8B/5: Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures/ Mixed Sand and Gravel Beaches | 8B/9A: Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 8C: Sheltered Riprap | 8C/9A: Sheltered Riprap/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 9A/7: Sheltered Tidal Flats/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 10A: Salt and Brackish Water Marsh | 10A/9A: Salt and Brackish Water Marsh/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 10C: Tall Mangroves | 10C/3A: Tall Mangroves/ Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches | 10C/3A/7: Tall Mangroves/ Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 10C/3A/9A: Tall Mangroves/ Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 10C/4/7: Tall Mangroves/ Coarse-grained Sand Beaches/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 10C/7: Tall Mangroves/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 10C/8A: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered Rocky Shores | 10C/8A/9A: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered Rocky Shores/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 10C/8B/3A: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures/ Fine- to Medium-grained Sand Beaches | 10C/8B/9A: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered, Solid Man-made Structures/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 10C/8C: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered Riprap | 10C/8C/9A: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered Riprap/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 10C/9A: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | 10C/9A/7: Tall Mangroves/ Sheltered Tidal Flats/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 10D: Short Mangroves | 10D/7: Short Mangroves/ Exposed Tidal Flats | 10D/9A: Short Mangroves/ Sheltered Tidal Flats | U: Unranked |

LINE

CC ID: 542251
Seq. Order: 2
Data Storage Type: VARCHAR
Required: No
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

Type of geographic feature | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Allowed Values: B: Breakwater | F: Flat | H: Hydrography | I: Index | M: Marsh | S: Shoreline |

SOURCE_ID

CC ID: 542252
Seq. Order: 3
Data Storage Type: VARCHAR
Required: No
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

Data source for the ESI | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Allowed Values: 2: Overflight | 3: Aerial Photography | 5: Digitized from scanned NIMA maps | 7: Digital (Generated by Research Planning, Inc.) | 8: Digital data from El Salvador ESI Atlas, Research Planning, Inc., Columbia, SC |

ENVIR

CC ID: 542253
Seq. Order: 4
Data Storage Type: VARCHAR
Required: No
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

Regional environment | Description Source: Research Planning, Inc.

Allowed Values: E: Estuarine | U: Unranked |

Catalog Details

Catalog Item ID: 42777
GUID: gov.noaa.nmfs.inport:42777
Metadata Record Created By: Tyler Christensen
Metadata Record Created: 2017-04-06 11:29+0000
Metadata Record Last Modified By: SysAdmin InPortAdmin
Metadata Record Last Modified: 2022-08-09 17:11+0000
Metadata Record Published: 2017-08-07
Owner Org: ORR
Metadata Publication Status: Published Externally
Do Not Publish?: N
Metadata Last Review Date: 2017-08-07
Metadata Review Frequency: 1 Year
Metadata Next Review Date: 2018-08-07