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Title: Rapid Invasion of Indo-Pacific Lionfishes (Pterois Volitans and Pterois Miles) in the Florida Keys, USA: Evidence from Multiple Pre- and Post-Invasion Data Sets
Short Name: Rapid Invasion of Indo-Pacific Lionfishes (Pterois Volitans and Pterois Miles) in the Florida Keys, USA: Evidence from Multiple Pre- and Post-Invasion Data Sets
Status: In Work
Abstract:

Over the past decade, Indo-Pacific lionfishes, Pterois volitans (Linnaeus, 1758) and Pterois miles (Bennett, 1828), venomous members of the scorpionfish family (Scorpaenidae), have invaded and spread throughout much of the tropical and subtropical northwestern Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. These species are generalist predators of fishes and invertebrates with the potential to disrupt the ecology of the invaded range. Lionfishes have been present in low numbers along the east coast of Florida since the 1980s, but were not reported in the Florida Keys until 2009. We document the appearance and rapid spread of lionfishes in the Florida Keys using multiple long-term data sets that include both pre- and post-invasion sampling. Our results are the first to quantify the invasion of lionfishes in a new area using multiple independent, ongoing monitoring data sets, two of which have explicit estimates of sampling effort. Between 2009 and 2011, lionfish frequency of occurrence, abundance, and biomass increased rapidly, increasing three- to six-fold between 2010 and 2011 alone. In addition, individuals were detected on a variety of reef and non-reef habitats throughout the Florida Keys. Because lionfish occurrence, abundance, and impacts are expected to continue to increase throughout the region, monitoring programs like those used in this study will be essential to document ecosystem changes that may result from this invasion.

Other Citation Details:

Provider: ingentaconnect

Database: ingentaconnect

Content: application/x-research-info-systems

TY - ABST

AU - Ruttenberg, Benjamin I

AU - Schofield, Pamela J

AU - Akins, J Lad

AU - Acosta, Alejandro

AU - Feeley, Michael W

AU - Blondeau, Jeremiah

AU - Smith, Steven G

AU - Ault, Jerald S

TI - Rapid Invasion of Indo-Pacific Lionfishes (<i>Pterois Volitans</i> and <i>Pterois Miles</i>) in the Florida Keys, USA: Evidence from Multiple Pre- and Post-Invasion Data Sets

JO - Bulletin of Marine Science

PY - 2012-10-01T00:00:00///

VL - 88

IS - 4

SP - 1051

EP - 1059

N2 - Over the past decade, Indo-Pacific lionfishes, <i>Pterois volitans</i> (Linnaeus, 1758) and <i>Pterois miles</i> (Bennett, 1828), venomous members of the scorpionfish family (Scorpaenidae), have invaded and spread throughout much of the tropical and subtropical northwestern Atlantic

Ocean and Caribbean Sea. These species are generalist predators of fishes and invertebrates with the potential to disrupt the ecology of the invaded range. Lionfishes have been present in low numbers along the east coast of Florida since the 1980s, but were not reported in the Florida Keys

until 2009. We document the appearance and rapid spread of lionfishes in the Florida Keys using multiple long-term data sets that include both pre- and post-invasion sampling. Our results are the first to quantify the invasion of lionfishes in a new area using multiple independent, ongoing

monitoring data sets, two of which have explicit estimates of sampling effort. Between 2009 and 2011, lionfish frequency of occurrence, abundance, and biomass increased rapidly, increasing three- to six-fold between 2010 and 2011 alone. In addition, individuals were detected on a variety of

reef and non-reef habitats throughout the Florida Keys. Because lionfish occurrence, abundance, and impacts are expected to continue to increase throughout the region, monitoring programs like those used in this study will be essential to document ecosystem changes that may result from this

invasion.

UR - http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/umrsmas/bullmar/2012/00000088/00000004/art00014

M3 - doi:10.5343/bms.2011.1108

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.5343/bms.2011.1108

ER -

DOI (Digital Object Identifier): 10.5343/bms.2011.1108

Keywords

Theme Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
UNCONTROLLED
None invasive species
None Lionfishes
None Pterois miles
None Pterois volitans
None Scorpaenidae

Temporal Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
UNCONTROLLED
None 2003-present

Spatial Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
UNCONTROLLED
None florida keys

Catalog Details

Catalog Item ID: 22652
GUID: gov.noaa.nmfs.inport:22652
Metadata Record Created By: Lee M Weinberger
Metadata Record Created: 2014-11-17 13:05+0000
Metadata Record Last Modified By: SysAdmin InPortAdmin
Metadata Record Last Modified: 2022-08-09 17:11+0000
Metadata Record Published: 2022-02-28
Owner Org: SEFSC
Metadata Publication Status: Published Externally
Do Not Publish?: N
Metadata Last Review Date: 2022-02-28
Metadata Review Frequency: 1 Year
Metadata Next Review Date: 2023-02-28