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Item Identification

Title: Ballard Locks Pit Tag Data
Short Name: Ballard Locks Pit Tag Data
Status: Planned
Abstract:

Understanding the factors influencing the success of juvenile Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in newly colonized habitats is essential to their recovery in large areas across theWest Coast of the United States and Canada.We studied biotic and abiotic factors associated with survival during the early stages of colonization and population establishment of juvenile coho salmon O. kisutch in Rock Creek, a tributary of the upper Cedar River in the LakeWashington basin of Puget Sound, Washington. The stream was occupied by resident fishes (e.g., rainbow trout O. mykiss, cutthroat trout O. clarkii, speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus, and several sculpins Cottus spp.), but adult coho salmon and other anadromous fishes had been excluded by a dam from 1901 until fish ladder installation in 2003. We defined logistic regression models and used an information-theoretic approach to predict apparent survival with various combinations of individual fish condition, location competition, and local habitat quality. The best-approximating models included measures of brood year, body size, habitat, and migration timing. Survival was positively associated with body size and habitat quality and negatively associated with competition. Survival from late summer to smolt migration varied among years (mean SD = 27 11%) and was significantly higher within Rock Creek (73 11%) than during seaward migration in the Cedar River and Lake Washington (38 14%). Juvenile coho salmon established a population and outnumbered resident salmonid species by 40% in the lower 2 km of Rock Creek within 5 years of colonization. Overall, the results revealed the linkage between the colonization success of juvenile coho salmon and the biotic features and habitat quality in a newly accessible environment during the stream-rearing phase of their life history. DOI: 10.1080/00028487.2011.587752.

Entity Information

Entity Type: Spreadsheet
Active Version?: Yes
Schema Name: PARR
Description:

Understanding the factors influencing the success of juvenile Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in newly colonized habitats is essential to their recovery in large areas across theWest Coast of the United States and Canada.We studied biotic and abiotic factors associated with survival during the early stages of colonization and population establishment of juvenile coho salmon O. kisutch in Rock Creek, a tributary of the upper Cedar River in the LakeWashington basin of Puget Sound, Washington. The stream was occupied by resident fishes (e.g., rainbow trout O. mykiss, cutthroat trout O. clarkii, speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus, and several sculpins Cottus spp.), but adult coho salmon and other anadromous fishes had been excluded by a dam from 1901 until fish ladder installation in 2003. We defined logistic regression models and used an information-theoretic approach to predict apparent survival with various combinations of individual fish condition, location competition, and local habitat quality. The best-approximating models included measures of brood year, body size, habitat, and migration timing. Survival was positively associated with body size and habitat quality and negatively associated with competition. Survival from late summer to smolt migration varied among years (mean SD = 27 11%) and was significantly higher within Rock Creek (73 11%) than during seaward migration in the Cedar River and Lake Washington (38 14%). Juvenile coho salmon established a population and outnumbered resident salmonid species by 40% in the lower 2 km of Rock Creek within 5 years of colonization. Overall, the results revealed the linkage between the colonization success of juvenile coho salmon and the biotic features and habitat quality in a newly accessible environment during the stream-rearing phase of their life history. DOI: 10.1080/00028487.2011.587752.

Data Attributes

Attribute Summary

Rubric Score Primary Key? Name Type Description
100
Location VARCHAR2 Location of the PIT tag array to track outmigrating juvenile salmonids.
100
Antenna VARCHAR2 An array of passive antennas which fish can swim through to determine direction of travel.
100
Date DATE Date and time at which PIT tagged fish went through antenna array.
100
PIT Code VARCHAR2 Alpha numeric code that identifies individual fish.

Attribute Details

Location

CC ID: 732265
Seq. Order: 1
Data Storage Type: VARCHAR2
Required: Yes
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

Location of the PIT tag array to track outmigrating juvenile salmonids.

General Data Type: VARCHAR2

Antenna

CC ID: 732266
Seq. Order: 2
Data Storage Type: VARCHAR2
Required: Yes
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

An array of passive antennas which fish can swim through to determine direction of travel.

General Data Type: VARCHAR2

Date

CC ID: 732267
Seq. Order: 3
Data Storage Type: DATE
Required: Yes
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

Date and time at which PIT tagged fish went through antenna array.

General Data Type: DATE

PIT Code

CC ID: 732268
Seq. Order: 4
Data Storage Type: VARCHAR2
Required: Yes
Primary Key: No
Status: Active
Description:

Alpha numeric code that identifies individual fish.

General Data Type: VARCHAR2

Catalog Details

Catalog Item ID: 37565
GUID: gov.noaa.nmfs.inport:37565
Metadata Record Created By: Jeffrey W Cowen
Metadata Record Created: 2017-04-03 14:18+0000
Metadata Record Last Modified By: SysAdmin InPortAdmin
Metadata Record Last Modified: 2019-06-04 13:14+0000
Metadata Record Published: 2018-02-27
Owner Org: NWFSC
Metadata Publication Status: Published Externally
Do Not Publish?: N
Metadata Next Review Date: 2019-02-28