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Short Citation:
Northwest Fisheries Science Center, 2022: Oceanographic and physiological parameters relating to Heterosigma akashiwo in Puget Sound - The Ecophysiology and Toxicity of Heterosigma akashiwo in Puget Sound: A Living Laboratory Ecosystem Approach, https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/inport/item/17794.

Item Identification

Title: Oceanographic and physiological parameters relating to Heterosigma akashiwo in Puget Sound - The Ecophysiology and Toxicity of Heterosigma akashiwo in Puget Sound: A Living Laboratory Ecosystem Approach
Short Name: Oceanographic and physiological parameters relating to Heterosigma akashiwo in Puget Sound
Status: Completed
Creation Date: 2011-05-01
Publication Date: 2017-02-13
Abstract:

Over one half of the worlds fish production for human consumption currently comes from aquaculture, while wild fisheries yields are either stable or declining. Recurring threats from the raphidophyte, Heterosigma akashiwo Hada (Sournia) have caused extensive damage ($2-6 million per episode) to wild and net-penned fish of Puget Sound, Washington, and are believed to be increasing in scope and magnitude in this region, and elsewhere in the world over the past two decades. The mechanism of H. akashiwo toxicity is not well understood. The toxic activity of H. akashiwo has been attributed to the production of reactive oxygen species, brevetoxin-like compound(s), excessive mucus, or hemolytic activity; however these mechanisms are not confirmed consistently in all fish-killing events or cultured strains. The difficulty of conducting research with active, toxin-producing field populations of H. akashiwo have resulted in conflicting findings from those obtained in lab culture studies, thereby limiting the ability of fish farmers to respond to these episodic blooms. Collaborators in this project are: Vera Trainer (NWFSC), William Cochlan (San Francisco State University), Charles Trick (University of Western Ontario), and Mark Wells (University of Maine). The overall goal of this project is to identify the primary toxic element and the specific environmental factors that stimulate fish-killing H. akashiwo blooms, and thereby provide managers with the fundamental tools needed to help reduce the frequency and toxic magnitude of these harmful algal events. Studies to date have provided incomplete and conflicting observations on the mode of toxicity and the environmental stimulation of toxification. We propose a three-pronged approach to study the environmental controls of H. akashiwo growth and toxin production; laboratory culture experiments, field observations, and bottle and mesocosm manipulation experiments.The project objectives are to: 1. identify the element(s) of toxic activity (inorganic, organic, or synergistic) associated with blooms of H. akashiwo and the various cellular morphologies of this alga, 2. determine the environmental parameters that stimulate the growth success and expression of cell toxicity in the H. akashiwo populations of Puget Sound. Because previous studies have used H. akashiwo cultures with little or no toxic activity, our approach is to use a living laboratory to study H. akashiwo bloom ecology and toxicity using natural assemblages. Using a mobile lab at field sites where H. akashiwo cells are regularly found will enable us to fully characterize the toxic element(s) responsible for fish mortality, and the environmental factors influencing toxicity. Findings from annual field studies in June and two rapid response deployments during major bloom events will be confirmed using laboratory studies with fresh ( 6 mo. old) isolates. The expected results are: 1. determination of the key elements of toxicity of H. akashiwo, 2. characterization of the environmental variables that influence either the induction or depression of elements of toxic activity in H. akashiwo, 3. characterization of environmentally-induced metabolites corresponding to condition of toxin production (metabolomics) and 4. design of a strategy for realistic mitigation of H. akashiwo activities in Puget Sound, Washington. This is a stand-alone project funded for 3 years through the NOAA/NSF ECOHAB program.

Contains oceanographic parameters such as temperature, salinity, density, fluorescence and nutrient concentrations. Also contains information on the toxic elements of Heterosigma akashiwo and physiological conditions related to observed toxic effects.

Purpose:

Raw/field data, Monitoring or sensor data, Time series (of types 1-3), Laboratory data

Notes:

Loaded by batch 4080, 01-22-2013 19:34

Supplemental Information:

Subject to Public Access to Research Results (PARR): Yes

Data: Determine the toxin produced by Heterosigma to allow tracking of blooms threatening fish farms.

Data: Determine the environmental factors promoting toxicity in Heterosigma to allow forecasting of blooms.

Peer Reviewed Publication: Research paper in special issue on HABs in Stratified Systems.

Keywords

Theme Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
UNCONTROLLED
None marine toxin

Spatial Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
UNCONTROLLED
None East Sound, Orcas Island
None ECOREGION
None Ecoregions
None Friday Harbor Laboratories
None Montlake
None NWFSC Montlake
None Puget Trough/Georgia Basin
None US Waters of Puget Sound/Georgia Basin

Instrument Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
UNCONTROLLED
None and Depth
None In-Situ Instrument - In-Situ Instrument (not specified)
None Sonde and Probe - Conductivity
None Temperature

Platform Keywords

Thesaurus Keyword
UNCONTROLLED
None Animal and Plant Collection Device
None Animal and Plant Collection Device - Plankton Collection Device - Plankton Net
None Water Sampler Bottle - Surface Sample Bottle

Physical Location

Organization: Northwest Fisheries Science Center
City: Seattle
State/Province: WA
Country: USA

Data Set Information

Data Set Scope Code: Data Set
Data Set Type: Access Database
Data Presentation Form: Table (digital)

Support Roles

Data Steward

CC ID: 848722
Date Effective From: 2015-10-01
Date Effective To:
Contact (Person): Adams, Nicolaus G
Address: 2725 Montlake Blvd East
Seattle, WA 98112-2097
Email Address: Nicolaus.Adams@noaa.gov
Phone: 206-860-6787
Fax: 206-860-3335

Distributor

CC ID: 848723
Date Effective From: 2015-10-01
Date Effective To:
Contact (Organization): Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC)
Address: 2725 Montlake Boulevard East
Seattle, WA 98112
USA
Email Address: nmfs.nwfsc.metadata@noaa.gov
Phone: 206-860-3200
URL: NWFSC Home

Metadata Contact

CC ID: 848721
Date Effective From: 2015-10-01
Date Effective To:
Contact (Organization): Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC)
Address: 2725 Montlake Boulevard East
Seattle, WA 98112
USA
Email Address: nmfs.nwfsc.metadata@noaa.gov
Phone: 206-860-3200
URL: NWFSC Home

Originator

CC ID: 848725
Date Effective From: 2015-10-01
Date Effective To:
Contact (Person): Adams, Nicolaus G
Address: 2725 Montlake Blvd East
Seattle, WA 98112-2097
Email Address: Nicolaus.Adams@noaa.gov
Phone: 206-860-6787
Fax: 206-860-3335

Point of Contact

CC ID: 848724
Date Effective From: 2015-10-01
Date Effective To:
Contact (Person): Adams, Nicolaus G
Address: 2725 Montlake Blvd East
Seattle, WA 98112-2097
Email Address: Nicolaus.Adams@noaa.gov
Phone: 206-860-6787
Fax: 206-860-3335

Extents

Extent Group 1

Extent Group 1 / Geographic Area 1

CC ID: 848733
W° Bound: -122.3062
E° Bound: -122.3062
N° Bound: 47.6449
S° Bound: 47.6449
Description

NWFSC Montlake

Extent Group 1 / Time Frame 1

CC ID: 848732
Time Frame Type: Range
Start: 2010-10-01
End: 2013-09-30

Extent Group 2

Extent Group 2 / Geographic Area 1

CC ID: 848736
W° Bound: -122.8963
E° Bound: -122.8963
N° Bound: 48.6644
S° Bound: 48.6644
Description

East Sound, Orcas Island

Extent Group 2 / Time Frame 1

CC ID: 848735
Time Frame Type: Range
Start: 2010-10-01
End: 2013-09-30

Extent Group 3

Extent Group 3 / Geographic Area 1

CC ID: 848739
W° Bound: -123.0144
E° Bound: -123.0144
N° Bound: 48.5458
S° Bound: 48.5458
Description

Friday Harbor Laboratories

Extent Group 3 / Time Frame 1

CC ID: 848738
Time Frame Type: Range
Start: 2010-10-01
End: 2013-09-30

Extent Group 4

Extent Group 4 / Geographic Area 1

CC ID: 848742
W° Bound: -125.3893
E° Bound: -119.9604
N° Bound: 50.5101
S° Bound: 47.0437
Description

US Waters of Puget Sound/Georgia Basin

Extent Group 4 / Time Frame 1

CC ID: 848741
Time Frame Type: Range
Start: 2010-10-01
End: 2013-09-30

Access Information

Security Class: Unclassified
Data Access Procedure:

At this time, contact the Data Manager for information on obtaining access to this data set. In the near future, the NWFSC will strive to provide all non-sensitive data resources as a web service in order to meet the NOAA Data Access Policy Directive (https://nosc.noaa.gov/EDMC/PD.DA.php).

Data Access Constraints:

NA

Distribution Information

Distribution 1

CC ID: 848729
Start Date: 2017-02-13
End Date: Present
Download URL: https://www.webapps.nwfsc.noaa.gov/apex/parr/noaansf_ecohab_heterosigma_ctd/data/page/
Distributor: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2015-10-01 - Present)
File Name: NOAA/NSF ECOHAB Heterosigma CTD (RESTful)
Description:

Over one half of the worlds fish production for human consumption currently comes from aquaculture, while wild fisheries yields are either stable or declining. Recurring threats from the raphidophyte, Heterosigma akashiwo Hada (Sournia) have caused extensive damage ($2-6 million per episode) to wild and net-penned fish of Puget Sound, Washington, and are believed to be increasing in scope and magnitude in this region, and elsewhere in the world over the past two decades. The mechanism of H. akashiwo toxicity is not well understood. The toxic activity of H. akashiwo has been attributed to the production of reactive oxygen species, brevetoxin-like compound(s), excessive mucus, or hemolytic activity; however these mechanisms are not confirmed consistently in all fish-killing events or cultured strains. The difficulty of conducting research with active, toxin-producing field populations of H. akashiwo have resulted in conflicting findings from those obtained in lab culture studies, thereby limiting the ability of fish farmers to respond to these episodic blooms. Collaborators in this project are: Vera Trainer (NWFSC), William Cochlan (San Francisco State University), Charles Trick (University of Western Ontario), and Mark Wells (University of Maine). The overall goal of this project is to identify the primary toxic element and the specific environmental factors that stimulate fish-killing H. akashiwo blooms, and thereby provide managers with the fundamental tools needed to help reduce the frequency and toxic magnitude of these harmful algal events. Studies to date have provided incomplete and conflicting observations on the mode of toxicity and the environmental stimulation of toxification. We propose a three-pronged approach to study the environmental controls of H. akashiwo growth and toxin production; laboratory culture experiments, field observations, and bottle and mesocosm manipulation experiments.The project objectives are to: 1. identify the element(s) of toxic activity (inorganic, organic, or synergistic) associated with blooms of H. akashiwo and the various cellular morphologies of this alga, 2. determine the environmental parameters that stimulate the growth success and expression of cell toxicity in the H. akashiwo populations of Puget Sound. Because previous studies have used H. akashiwo cultures with little or no toxic activity, our approach is to use a living laboratory to study H. akashiwo bloom ecology and toxicity using natural assemblages. Using a mobile lab at field sites where H. akashiwo cells are regularly found will enable us to fully characterize the toxic element(s) responsible for fish mortality, and the environmental factors influencing toxicity. Findings from annual field studies in June and two rapid response deployments during major bloom events will be confirmed using laboratory studies with fresh ( 6 mo. old) isolates. The expected results are: 1. determination of the key elements of toxicity of H. akashiwo, 2. characterization of the environmental variables that influence either the induction or depression of elements of toxic activity in H. akashiwo, 3. characterization of environmentally-induced metabolites corresponding to condition of toxin production (metabolomics) and 4. design of a strategy for realistic mitigation of H. akashiwo activities in Puget Sound, Washington. This is a stand-alone project funded for 3 years through the NOAA/NSF ECOHAB program.

Distribution 2

CC ID: 848727
Start Date: 2017-02-13
End Date: Present
Download URL: https://www.webapps.nwfsc.noaa.gov/apex/parr/noaansf_ecohab_heterosigma_discreete_data/data/page/
Distributor: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2015-10-01 - Present)
File Name: NOAA/NSF ECOHAB Heterosigma Discreete Data (RESTfu
Description:

Over one half of the worlds fish production for human consumption currently comes from aquaculture, while wild fisheries yields are either stable or declining. Recurring threats from the raphidophyte, Heterosigma akashiwo Hada (Sournia) have caused extensive damage ($2-6 million per episode) to wild and net-penned fish of Puget Sound, Washington, and are believed to be increasing in scope and magnitude in this region, and elsewhere in the world over the past two decades. The mechanism of H. akashiwo toxicity is not well understood. The toxic activity of H. akashiwo has been attributed to the production of reactive oxygen species, brevetoxin-like compound(s), excessive mucus, or hemolytic activity; however these mechanisms are not confirmed consistently in all fish-killing events or cultured strains. The difficulty of conducting research with active, toxin-producing field populations of H. akashiwo have resulted in conflicting findings from those obtained in lab culture studies, thereby limiting the ability of fish farmers to respond to these episodic blooms. Collaborators in this project are: Vera Trainer (NWFSC), William Cochlan (San Francisco State University), Charles Trick (University of Western Ontario), and Mark Wells (University of Maine). The overall goal of this project is to identify the primary toxic element and the specific environmental factors that stimulate fish-killing H. akashiwo blooms, and thereby provide managers with the fundamental tools needed to help reduce the frequency and toxic magnitude of these harmful algal events. Studies to date have provided incomplete and conflicting observations on the mode of toxicity and the environmental stimulation of toxification. We propose a three-pronged approach to study the environmental controls of H. akashiwo growth and toxin production; laboratory culture experiments, field observations, and bottle and mesocosm manipulation experiments.The project objectives are to: 1. identify the element(s) of toxic activity (inorganic, organic, or synergistic) associated with blooms of H. akashiwo and the various cellular morphologies of this alga, 2. determine the environmental parameters that stimulate the growth success and expression of cell toxicity in the H. akashiwo populations of Puget Sound. Because previous studies have used H. akashiwo cultures with little or no toxic activity, our approach is to use a living laboratory to study H. akashiwo bloom ecology and toxicity using natural assemblages. Using a mobile lab at field sites where H. akashiwo cells are regularly found will enable us to fully characterize the toxic element(s) responsible for fish mortality, and the environmental factors influencing toxicity. Findings from annual field studies in June and two rapid response deployments during major bloom events will be confirmed using laboratory studies with fresh ( 6 mo. old) isolates. The expected results are: 1. determination of the key elements of toxicity of H. akashiwo, 2. characterization of the environmental variables that influence either the induction or depression of elements of toxic activity in H. akashiwo, 3. characterization of environmentally-induced metabolites corresponding to condition of toxin production (metabolomics) and 4. design of a strategy for realistic mitigation of H. akashiwo activities in Puget Sound, Washington. This is a stand-alone project funded for 3 years through the NOAA/NSF ECOHAB program.

Distribution 3

CC ID: 848728
Start Date: 2017-02-13
End Date: Present
Download URL: https://www.webapps.nwfsc.noaa.gov/apex/parrdata/inventory/tables/table/noaansf_ecohab_heterosigma_ctd
Distributor: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2015-10-01 - Present)
File Name: NOAA/NSF ECOHAB Heterosigma CTD
Description:

Over one half of the worlds fish production for human consumption currently comes from aquaculture, while wild fisheries yields are either stable or declining. Recurring threats from the raphidophyte, Heterosigma akashiwo Hada (Sournia) have caused extensive damage ($2-6 million

per episode) to wild and net-penned fish of Puget Sound, Washington, and are believed to be increasing in scope and magnitude in this region, and elsewhere in the world over the past two decades. The mechanism of H. akashiwo toxicity is not well understood. The toxic activity of H. akashiwo has been attributed to the production of reactive oxygen species, brevetoxin-like compound(s), excessive mucus, or hemolytic activity; however these mechanisms are not confirmed consistently in all fish-killing events or cultured strains. The difficulty of conducting research with active, toxin-producing field populations of H. akashiwo have resulted in conflicting findings from those obtained in lab culture studies, thereby limiting the ability of fish farmers to respond to these episodic blooms. Collaborators in this project are: Vera Trainer (NWFSC), William Cochlan (San Francisco State University), Charles Trick (University of Western Ontario), and Mark Wells (University of Maine). The overall goal of this project is to identify the primary toxic element and the specific environmental factors that stimulate fish-killing H. akashiwo blooms, and thereby provide managers with the fundamental tools needed to help reduce the frequency and toxic magnitude of these harmful algal events. Studies to date have provided incomplete and conflicting observations on the mode of toxicity and the environmental stimulation of toxification. We propose a three-pronged approach to study the environmental controls of H. akashiwo growth and toxin production; laboratory culture experiments, field observations, and bottle and mesocosm manipulation experiments.The project objectives are to: 1. identify the element(s) of toxic activity (inorganic, organic, or synergistic) associated with blooms of H. akashiwo and the various cellular morphologies of this alga, 2. determine the environmental parameters that stimulate the growth success and expression of cell toxicity in the H. akashiwo populations of Puget Sound. Because previous studies have used H. akashiwo cultures with little or no toxic activity, our approach is to use a living laboratory to study H. akashiwo bloom ecology and toxicity using natural assemblages. Using a mobile lab at field sites where H. akashiwo cells are regularly found will enable us to fully characterize the toxic element(s) responsible for fish mortality, and the environmental factors influencing toxicity. Findings from annual field studies in June and two rapid response deployments during major bloom events will be confirmed using laboratory studies with fresh ( 6 mo. old) isolates. The expected results are: 1. determination of the key elements of toxicity of H. akashiwo, 2. characterization of the environmental variables that influence either the induction or depression of elements of toxic activity in H. akashiwo, 3. characterization of environmentally-induced metabolites corresponding to condition of toxin production (metabolomics) and 4. design of a strategy for realistic mitigation of H. akashiwo activities in Puget Sound, Washington. This is a stand-alone project funded for 3 years through the NOAA/NSF ECOHAB program.

Distribution 4

CC ID: 848726
Start Date: 2017-02-13
End Date: Present
Download URL: https://www.webapps.nwfsc.noaa.gov/apex/parrdata/inventory/tables/table/noaansf_ecohab_heterosigma_discreete_data
Distributor: Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC) (2015-10-01 - Present)
File Name: NOAA/NSF ECOHAB Heterosigma Discreete Data
Description:

Over one half of the worlds fish production for human consumption currently comes from aquaculture, while wild fisheries yields are either stable or declining. Recurring threats from the raphidophyte, Heterosigma akashiwo Hada (Sournia) have caused extensive damage ($2-6 million per episode) to wild and net-penned fish of Puget Sound, Washington, and are believed to be increasing in scope and magnitude in this region, and elsewhere in the world over the past two decades. The mechanism of H. akashiwo toxicity is not well understood. The toxic activity of H. akashiwo has been attributed to the production of reactive oxygen species, brevetoxin-like compound(s), excessive mucus, or hemolytic activity; however these mechanisms are not confirmed consistently in all fish-killing events or cultured strains. The difficulty of conducting research with active, toxin-producing field populations of H. akashiwo have resulted in conflicting findings from those obtained in lab culture studies, thereby limiting the ability of fish farmers to respond to these episodic blooms. Collaborators in this project are: Vera Trainer (NWFSC), William Cochlan (San Francisco State University), Charles Trick (University of Western Ontario), and Mark Wells (University of Maine). The overall goal of this project is to identify the primary toxic element and the specific environmental factors that stimulate fish-killing H. akashiwo blooms, and thereby provide managers with the fundamental tools needed to help reduce the frequency and toxic magnitude of these harmful algal events. Studies to date have provided incomplete and conflicting observations on the mode of toxicity and the environmental stimulation of toxification. We propose a three-pronged approach to study the environmental controls of H. akashiwo growth and toxin production; laboratory culture experiments, field observations, and bottle and mesocosm manipulation experiments.The project objectives are to: 1. identify the element(s) of toxic activity (inorganic, organic, or synergistic) associated with blooms of H. akashiwo and the various cellular morphologies of this alga, 2. determine the environmental parameters that stimulate the growth success and expression of cell toxicity in the H. akashiwo populations of Puget Sound. Because previous studies have used H. akashiwo cultures with little or no toxic activity, our approach is to use a living laboratory to study H. akashiwo bloom ecology and toxicity using natural assemblages. Using a mobile lab at field sites where H. akashiwo cells are regularly found will enable us to fully characterize the toxic element(s) responsible for fish mortality, and the environmental factors influencing toxicity. Findings from annual field studies in June and two rapid response deployments during major bloom events will be confirmed using laboratory studies with fresh ( 6 mo. old) isolates. The expected results are: 1. determination of the key elements of toxicity of H. akashiwo, 2. characterization of the environmental variables that influence either the induction or depression of elements of toxic activity in H. akashiwo, 3. characterization of environmentally-induced metabolites corresponding to condition of toxin production (metabolomics) and 4. design of a strategy for realistic mitigation of H. akashiwo activities in Puget Sound, Washington. This is a stand-alone project funded for 3 years through the NOAA/NSF ECOHAB program.

URLs

URL 1

CC ID: 848730
URL: https://www.webapps.nwfsc.noaa.gov/apex/parrdata/inventory/datasets/dataset/4075
Name: Oceanographic and physiological parameters relating to Heterosigma akashiwo in Puget Sound
URL Type:
Online Resource
File Resource Format: Web site
Description:

NWFSC Dataset Information page. Contains oceanographic parameters such as temperature, salinity, density, fluorescence and nutrient concentrations. Also contains information on the toxic elements of Heterosigma akashiwo and physiological conditions related to observed toxic effects.

Technical Environment

Description:

Access Database

Data Quality

Accuracy:

High

Quality Control Procedures Employed:

These data were collected and processed in accordance with established protocols and best practices under the direction of the project’s Principal Investigator. Contact the dataset Data Manager for full QA/QC methodology.

Data Management

Have Resources for Management of these Data Been Identified?: No
Approximate Percentage of Budget for these Data Devoted to Data Management: 0
Do these Data Comply with the Data Access Directive?: No
Is Access to the Data Limited Based on an Approved Waiver?: No
If Distributor (Data Hosting Service) is Needed, Please Indicate: No
Approximate Delay Between Data Collection and Dissemination: 0 days
If Delay is Longer than Latency of Automated Processing, Indicate Under What Authority Data Access is Delayed:

No Delay

Actual or Planned Long-Term Data Archive Location: NCEI-MD
Approximate Delay Between Data Collection and Archiving: 365
How Will the Data Be Protected from Accidental or Malicious Modification or Deletion Prior to Receipt by the Archive?:

The Northwest Fisheries Science Center facilitates backup and recovery of all data and IT components which are managed by IT Operations through the capture of static (point-in-time) backup data to physical media. Once data is captured to physical media (every 1-3 days), a duplicate is made and routinely (weekly) transported to an offsite archive facility where it is maintained throughout the data's applicable life-cycle.

Lineage

Lineage Statement:

NA

Child Items

Rubric scores updated every 15m

Rubric Score Type Title
Entity NOAA/NSF ECOHAB Heterosigma CTD
Entity NOAA/NSF ECOHAB Heterosigma Discreete Data

Catalog Details

Catalog Item ID: 17794
GUID: gov.noaa.nmfs.inport:17794
Metadata Record Created By: Robert Marsicek
Metadata Record Created: 2013-01-22 19:34+0000
Metadata Record Last Modified By: SysAdmin InPortAdmin
Metadata Record Last Modified: 2019-06-04 13:14+0000
Metadata Record Published: 2019-06-04
Owner Org: NWFSC
Metadata Publication Status: Published Externally
Do Not Publish?: N
Metadata Next Review Date: 2020-06-04