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Life History of Two Data-Poor but Commercially Valuable Tropical Reef Fishes: Parupeneus Barberinus and Mulloidichthys Flavolineatus From the Saipan Fishery, Northern Mariana Islands

September 07, 2020

Age, growth, mortality, and reproduction information for two tropical goatfish species, Parupeneus barberinus and Mulloidichthys flavolineatus, from the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.

We provide a detailed characterisation of the life histories of two commercially important tropical goatfish species, Parupeneus barberinus and Mulloidichthys flavolineatus, from the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands. Two years of continuous fishery-dependent data were used to assess age, growth, mortality, and reproduction. Both species are short-lived, with a maximum age of 5 years and maturation within the first year of life. Female and male P. barberinus reach 50% maturity at 15.4- and 20.2-cm fork length (FL), respectively. The M. flavolineatus females and males reach 50% maturity at 15.8- and 16.1-cm FL. Temporal variation in the reproductive cycle of M. flavolineatus indicated that average monthly gonadosomatic index had a clear reproductive period of May–June and an anomalously high peak in November. The reproductive seasonality of P. barberinus was less clear, owing to the abnormally high proportion of inactive physiologically mature females found throughout the year in the fishery across a wide size range. Migrations of P. barberinus into and out of the main fishing area (Saipan lagoon) may explain why the fishery does not encompass the actively spawning population.


Reed EM, Taylor BM. 2020. Life history of two data-poor but commercially valuable tropical reef fishes, Parupeneus barberinus and Mulloidichthys flavolineatus, from the Saipan fishery, Northern Mariana Islands. Marine and Freshwater Research.  https://doi.org/10.1071/MF20049.

Last updated by Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center on 11/23/2020

Reef Fish