International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas

ICCAT is one of many regional fisheries management organizations where countries and fishing entities come together to discuss and develop international fisheries management measures.

Atlantic Pacific skipjack tuna

Atlantic Pacific skipjack tuna. Credit: iStock

The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas oversees the conservation and management of a variety of Atlantic marine species, including tunas, swordfish, marlin and sharks, and adopts measures to minimize bycatch of turtles and seabirds associated with these fisheries. This responsibility is shared among ICCAT’s 48 members, including the United States.

Annual Meeting Highlights

Atlantic Bluefin Tuna: As ICCAT Meets to Set New Catch Quotas, What Does the Stock Assessment Say?

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NOAA Fisheries scientist Clay Porch chaired ICCAT's stock assessment for the Western stock of Atlantic bluefin tuna. Credit: NOAA

An interview with Dr. Clay Porch, the NOAA Fisheries scientist who chaired the assessment for the Western stock of Atlantic bluefin tuna.

 

ICCAT Advisory Committee

The Advisory Committee to the U.S. Section to the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas was established under the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act . The committee comprises individuals representing commercial industries, recreational fishing organizations, environmental groups and academia. Committee members are nominated every 2 years and give advice to U.S. ICCAT commissioners on international issues related to the conservation and management of Atlantic highly migratory species.

The ICCAT advisory committee generally meets twice a year. For more information, contact the committee’s executive secretary:  Terra Lederhouse—terra.lederhouse@noaa.gov.

Go to annual meeting materials

 

Last updated by Office of International Affairs & Seafood Inspection on June 22, 2018