Surveying a Vast Ocean

We conduct research, monitoring, and analysis of living marine resources and ecosystems across the U.S. Pacific Ocean.

Diver conducts coral reef survey

Our field research activities range from near-shore island ecosystems like coral reefs to open ocean ecosystems on the high seas. We collect data on ocean conditions, conduct coral reef ecosystem assessment and monitoring, provide benthic habitat maps, and remove marine debris. We use numerical ecosystem models to analyze the current structure and dynamics of marine environments, as well as to examine potential projections of future conditions, such as those resulting from climate change impacts. Because humans are a key part of the ecosystem, our research also includes social and economic aspects of fishery and resource management decisions. We also provide scientific support to international organizations.

Highlights and focus areas include:

Resources

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Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument: 2000–2016 Overview

The overview booklet summarizes key findings and temporal trends from Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program surveys—part of

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Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Mariana Archipelago: 2003–2007 Overview

The overview booklet summarizes key findings and temporal trends from Mariana Archipelago Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (MARAMP)

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Coral Reef Ecosystems of American Samoa: 2002–2010 Overview

The overview booklet summarizes key findings and temporal trends from American Samoa Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (ASRAMP) surveys

Publications

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Tracking Changes on Fishery Economic Performance

The purpose of this report is twofold. First, it provides a first-time comprehensive review of the establishment and implementation of continuous

peer_reviewed

Combining Fish and Benthic Communities into Multiple Regimes Reveals Complex Reef Dynamics

Coral reefs worldwide face an uncertain future with many reefs reported to transition from being dominated by corals to macroalgae. However, given

peer_reviewed

Nocturnal Visual Census of Pelagic Fauna Using Scuba Near Kona, Hawai‘i

Plankton and micronekton occupy the base and intermediate levels of oceanic food webs and are generally regarded as difficult to quantify. Gelatinous

Last updated by Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center on February 22, 2019