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Eugenia Galtsoff: Dive Deeper Telegrams

July 08, 2021

Supplemental information about Eugenia Galtsoff life and times.

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Collage graphic of an old family photo album on a desk with pictures of the Russian Imperial Romanov family, Russian revolution propaganda posters, Lenin speech, framed photo of General Wrangel, ships sailing on the sea, recreated military map of the Bolshevik invasion into Crimea.

Translated Telegram from General Wrangel to the People in Crimea

Order from the Regent of South Russia and the Commander-In-Chief of the Russian Army
Sevastopol
October 29, 1920 (Old Style)
November 11, 1920 (New Style)

People of Russia! Alone in its struggle against the oppressor, the Russian Army has been maintaining an unequal con­test in its defense of the last strip of Russian territory on which law and truth hold sway. 

Conscious of my responsibility, I have tried to anticipate every possible contin­gency from the very beginning. 

I now order the evacuation and em­barkation at the Crimean ports of all those who are following the Russian Army on its road to Calvary, that is to say, the families of the soldiers, the offi­cials of the civil administration and their families, and anyone else who would be in danger if they fell into the hands of the enemy. 

The Army will cover the embarkation, knowing that the necessary ships for its own evacuation are ready and waiting in the ports according to a pre-arranged plan. I have done everything that human strength can do to fulfill my duty to the Army and the population. 

We cannot foretell our future fate.

We have no other territory than the Crimea, We have no money. Frankly as always, I warn you all of what awaits you. 

May God grant us strength and wis­dom to endure this period of Russian misery, and to survive it. 

—GENERAL WRANGEL

 

Telegram from The High Commissioner at Constantinople (Bristol) to the U.S. Secretary of State

The High Commissioner at Constantinople
Constantinople, Ottoman Empire
Sent: November 15, 1920
Received November 16, 1920

Crimea is being rapidly evacuated by General Wrangel. The military forces as well as civilian refugees are being embarked on both merchant and war vessels. About 6000 wounded are to be evacuated and already a number of these have arrived in Constantinople. Our vessels are assisting to evacuate non combatants, some wounded and women and children. It is estimated that total number evacuated from Crimea will be about 40,000. There are accommodations in Constantinople and surrounding districts for about 5000, but the housing arrangements are bad and heating arrangements worse with fuel scarce and very expensive. The cold weather in this district makes it practically impossible to provide for the Russian refugees at this season of the year. Food and clothing is scarce here and most expensive. Thus providing for the refugees here would require vastly larger funds than in some other place where the climate is warm and the necessities of life more reasonable in price. The northern coast of Africa has been suggested for colonizing all these refugees. I recommend the northern coast of Africa or some warm climate and then combined effort in different countries to provide for these refugees until they can become self sustaining. This should be carried out with the understanding that the military forces thus evacuated are disarmed unless some country is willing to take these military forces and assume responsibility for them. Our ships are being used to aid in this evacuation for the sake of humanity but with strict orders not to become involved in direct antagonism with Bolsheviks. The St. Louis and six destroyers with one American merchant vessel are engaged in evacuation of American citizens, American Red Cross, together with Red Cross supplies and American merchandise and Russian refugees. Repeated to Paris.

—BRISTOL

 

Last updated on 07/19/2021

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