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Meet Temi Oyewole, Funds Management Specialist

July 15, 2020

Temi Oyewole is a Funds Management Specialist for NOAA's Office of Habitat Conservation in the Operations, Management and Information Division. Learn more about her work.

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Temi Oyewole is a Funds Management Specialist for NOAA's Office of Habitat Conservation in the Operations, Management and Information Division. She has been with NOAA for 15 years, and currently works in Silver Spring, Maryland.

 

Describe a project related to habitat that you’re currently working on or that you enjoyed.

One project that I can think of that I enjoyed working on was putting together an interagency agreement with the National Park service. NOAA Fisheries will aid in restoration efforts in Caribbean park units that sustained significant damages caused by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. I felt this was an important project that may seem small, but will have a significant impact for the Virgin Islands.

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Temi Oyewole visits the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office in Annapolis, MD.

What habitat work has been especially successful or inspiring to you?

The work being done by the Deepwater Horizon team is truly incredible, and I am proud to help them achieve their goals in any way.

Describe a time when you were surprised by fish and/or habitat. 

I remember an article in our internal newsletter about the wave pool located in front of the NOAA Science Center in Silver Spring, Maryland. The sculpture is called “Coastline” is a real-time replica of the Atlantic surf. Its waves are generated from real-time wave measurement data transmitted from the Atlantic coast. I think it’s a mix of how science meets habitat and a cool way to bring the coastline to the city.

What person has expanded your understanding or connection to habitat?

About 10 years ago, the NOAA Restoration Center had a retreat in Philly. One night, another colleague and I were speaking with John Iliff about his field work when he lived in St. Petersburg, Florida. He broke down the intricate steps and projects it took to help rebuild coral reefs. He explained in plain language how our office is helping to resolve irreversible damage to coral. It was a real eye-opener, and I was more impressed by marine biology after that conversation.