Skip to main content
Unsupported Browser Detected

Internet Explorer lacks support for the features of this website. For the best experience, please use a modern browser such as Chrome, Firefox, or Edge.

New England's Groundfish in a Changing Climate

Waters off the Northeastern United States are among the fastest warming and most studied in the world’s ocean. Armed with decades of data and a strong appreciation of what climate change could mean for fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center researchers are focusing on science to help navigate this rapidly evolving future.

More On This Topic

 Color image taken during daylight from the upper deck of a research vessel, facing toward the rear of the vessel as it sails through a canal. Land is visible on each side of the canal, and the ship leaves a wake in the water. Two steel framed bridges are in the image. The ship has just passed under the bridge used by vehicles. The railroad bridge is in the distance. View over the stern of the NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow, exiting the Cape Cod Canal headed east toward Provincetown, Mass. at the beginning of Leg 3 of the 2021 Northeast Fisheries Science Center fall bottom trawl survey. The two bridges spanning the canal are used by trains (background) and vehicle traffic (foreground). Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Katelyn Depot.
Biologist on a ship collecting data during buoyless lobster trap tests. A Northeast Fisheries Science Center biologist collecting data during buoyless lobster trap tests.