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2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey

July 09, 2021

The 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey will be conducted from July 2 through October 15, 2021.

The 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey (CCES) will be conducted by the Fisheries Resources Division (FRD) at NOAA Fisheries' Southwest Fisheries Science Center, from NOAA ship Reuben Lasker. The primary objectives are to survey the distributions and abundances of coastal pelagic fish species (CPS), their prey, and their biotic and abiotic environments in the California Current between the northern extent of Vancouver Island, Canada, and Punta Eugenia, Baja California Norte, July 6 to October 15, 2021. Read the NOAA Fisheries story here

All Aboard! Participating on the 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey - Follow Dr. Blane Bellerud as he provides a personal perspective of what it is like to be aboard the R/V Reuben Lasker for the 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey.

September 19. 2021
Leg 3 is being led by Juan Zwolinski (Chief Scientists and Lead Acoustician). Joining him on the Acoustics team are David Murfin and Leslie Lopez (INAPESCA). Owyn Snodgrass is adeptly leading the Trawl Team including Jonathan Walker, Zach Skelton, Christina Fahy and Ella Adams. Emily Gardner is expertly leading the CUFES sampling, assisted by Selene Morales (INAPESCA).

Since the last update, Lasker progressed south without interruptions and is scheduled to complete the sampling of southernmost transect within U.S. waters by mid-afternoon September 20. For Leg 3, this totals an additional 14 transects (Fig. 1) and 29 trawls (Fig. 2). Throughout the leg, northern anchovy has been the dominant species in the catches, caught in 27 of the 29 trawls. Jack mackerel were caught in 20 trawls, Pacific mackerel were in 14, and Pacific sardine in 12. Northern anchovy was also the most abundant species by weight with an average of 51 kg per trawl, followed by Pacific sardine with 7.9 kg, and Pacific mackerel and Jack mackerel each with 1.5 kg per trawl. The majority of the CPS acoustic backscatter was concentrated between the mainland and the outer edge of the Channel Islands. This pattern matched that of anchovy eggs observed with CUFES (Fig. 1).

During the penultimate night of Leg 3, Lasker fished off La Jolla and Del Mar. On the last day of the leg, the ship will complete transect 39 and then attempt two trawl stations before heading to San Diego on Tuesday, September 21.

Meanwhile, fishing vessel Long Beach Carnage sampled the nearshore region with scientific echosounders and purse-seine. The regional catches have largely mimicked those by Lasker. Farther offshore, three Saildrones added 20-nmi extensions to Lasker’s transects to ensure that the western extents of the northern anchovy and Pacific sardine populations have been sampled.

Two maps of the West Coast
Figure 1. Left: Acoustic backscatter attributed to CPS for the entire 2021 summer survey. Right: egg densities collected with CUFES. Leg 3 surveyed mostly the Southern California Bight, where northern anchovy was predominant.
2 maps depicting West Coast
Figure 2. Left: Species composition in each trawl catch. Right: Species composition in the aggregated nightly trawl catches (trawl cluster). 

During one stretch of travel time, the team decided to document some of their previous catches with the traditional Japanese method of printing fish called Gyotaku.

Print of Engraulis mordax (161828) with Pyrosoma atlanticum (159636) by Emily Gardner
Engraulis mordax (161828) with Pyrosoma atlanticum (159636) by Emily Gardner

 

Print of Doryteuthis opalescens (82371) by Jon Walker
Doryteuthis opalescens (82371) by Jon Walker


September 12, 2021

After an 8-day delay due to engine ship repairs, the mandatory shelter-in-place for participants of Leg 3 started on August 30 and ended with scientists boarding Lasker on Tuesday, September 7. 

Upon boarding on the afternoon of September 7, scientists attended a welcome aboard meeting and participated on fire, abandon ship, and man overboard drills.

Lasker departed San Diego around 7AM on September 8 and transited to the inshore point of transect 53, north of Avila Beach. Along the transit, CUFES showed anchovy eggs in about 70% of the samples (Fig. 1). On the day of September 9, Lasker sampled transects 53 and 55 (Fig. 2), and in the night conducted three trawls that resulted predominantly in northern anchovy (Fig. 3). On September 10, Lasker deployed an instrumented lander and sampled transects 51 and 50. That night, Lasker performed three trawls. The first trawl resulted in an even catch of northern anchovy and Pacific sardine (Fig. 3), the second trawl was cancelled due to the continuous presence of marine mammals, and the third one yielded less than a kg of anchovy.

Three images of West Coast
Figure 1. Egg density maps collected using CUFES. The diagonal transit starting in San Diego corresponds to the initial transit of leg 3. Eggs of northern anchovy were the most abundant in the samples.
Echo Map
Figure 2. Midwater Echoes of CPS on transect 55 later identified by trawling to be northern anchovy.
Image of western coastline
Figure 3. Species composition obtained per night cluster (a cluster is composed of all the trawls performed each night). The two southernmost clusters correspond to the first two nights of sampling of leg 3 and were dominated by northern anchovy and Pacific sardine.

On Saturday, September 11, Lasker sampled transect 49 and the offshore portion of transect 48. It will remain west of Santa Rosa Island where it will conduct three trawls during the night. The wind picked to 20 – 30 kts, but so far the increasing wind and seas have not slowed down survey operations.

Fishing Vessel Long Beach Carnage departed from Long Beach on September 11 and transited north to resume sampling semi concurrently with Lasker. Over the next 10 days, Lasker and Long Beach Carnage will be sampling the southern California Bight. Long Beach Carnage will focus on the nearshore regions of the Bight and Lasker will survey the Bight in its entirety, complemented offshore by Saildrone sampling.

Image of persons sorting anchovy
Zack Skeleton and Christina Faye sorting Northern Anchovy. Photo by Owyn Snodgrass.

 

August 20, 2021

The 2021 Summer CCE Survey has reached its midpoint. On August 15, Lasker returned to port and is presently alongside at 10th Avenue Marine Terminal and on an extended ~2 week break to allow for crew rest and preparations for Legs 3 and 4. Leg 3 scientists and crew will soon begin their mandatory 7-d shelter in place prior to boarding the ship on September 2 and departure soon thereafter. Sampling during Leg 3 will resume southward from approximately Morro Bay, and work in coordination with three Saildrone USVs and one fishing vessel (F/V Long Beach Carnage) that is conducting acoustic and purse seine sampling in nearshore areas. We hope to complete sampling in the Southern California Bight during Leg 3 before a brief import in San Diego, and spend Leg 4 sampling the coastal waters of Baja California Norte.

August 14, 2021

On the evening of August 13, Lasker and her crew completed acoustic sampling along transect 057, just south of Cambria, CA, and conducted her last two trawls nearby before turning toward San Diego for an extended port call. After many days of high winds and rough seas, the weather finally decided to cooperate, which made for greater comfort but also allowed for more trawling opportunities and for us to achieve our goal of getting to approximately Morro Bay before heading for home for a well-deserved break.

This week we observed considerable acoustic backscatter in the echograms (Figure 1a), and many anchovies in the trawl samples (Figure 1c).  We also collected a few small, immature sardines. Fish eggs have been scarce in the CUFES, with only a few anchovy and jack mackerel eggs observed south of Cape Mendocino (Figure 1b).

Image of California coast depicting  a) distribution of 38-kHz integrated backscattering coefficients (sA, m2 nmi-2; averaged over 2000-m distance intervals and from 5 to 250-m deep) ascribed to CPS, b) CUFES egg density (eggs m-3) for anchovy and sardine, and c) proportions of CPS species (by weight) in trawl hauls (black points indicate trawl hauls with no CPS).
Figure 1. A map of the a) distribution of 38-kHz integrated backscattering coefficients (sA, m2 nmi-2; averaged over 2000-m distance intervals and from 5 to 250-m deep) ascribed to CPS, b) CUFES egg density (eggs m-3) for anchovy and sardine, and c) proportions of CPS species (by weight) in trawl hauls (black points indicate trawl hauls with no CPS).

Lasker has also been coordinating sampling with two fishing vessels, F/V Lisa Marie and F/V Long Beach Carnage, who continue to conduct acoustic and purse seine sampling in the shallow, nearshore waters that are unsampled by Lasker, and two Saildrone Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs) that are conducting acoustic sampling along every other transect along the coast of WA and OR, and between Pt. Arena and Pt. Conception. Lisa Marie completed sampling down to approximately Bodega Bay, where Long Beach Carnage graciously took the baton and continued sampling southward toward Pt. Conception. Generally, the purse seine catches from the fishing vessels has reflected the trawl catch from Laker. The two USVs are currently transiting south to continue sampling lines south of Pt. Arena, and will rendezvous with Lasker when she resumes sampling during Leg 3.

Prior to coming alongside at the 10th Avenue Marine Terminal (est. 1130 on August 15), the ship will bring aboard a compass certification person to re-certify the compass. With the ship arriving in the early morning to San Diego Bay we should be arriving at the dock at 11:30 am as scheduled.

A sincere thanks to all of the scientists, officers and crew for their continued effort and support, and a job well done. We will soon say goodbye to our Mexican colleagues as they leave the ship to return home to Mexico. Scientists and crew for Leg 3 will begin preparing for shelter in place (which begins on 25 August) prior to embarking on Leg 3, which is scheduled to depart on September 2.  
 

August 6, 2021
During the week of July 31 through August 6, the second leg of the Summer 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey continued with sampling from NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker, F/V Lisa Marie, and Saildrones 1055 and 1059. By Wednesday, August 4, the Saildrones were more than a week behind Lasker, despite the ship having finished five of the Saildrone lines, 107-99.  This lag was partially due to the omission of Lasker’s transects off Vancouver Island, which nearly eliminated Saildrone’s planned head start, and also to low winds and thus Saildrone speed. To reduce the time between sampling from the various vessels, David Demer requested that the Saildrones finish lines 111 and 109, skip the five Saildrone transects that Lasker had already completed, and sail south to get closer to Lasker. A third Saildrone will be launched from Alameda, California, to enable the unmanned sailboats to collectively progress more quickly. 

Aboard Lasker, Daniel Hernandez (INAPESCA) and John Barnes (OSU) weigh and measure Jack Mackerel (left), and Brittany Schwartzkopf and Lauren Martin (SWFSC) and Blane Bellerud (WCR) collect sardine ovary samples (right).
Aboard Lasker, Daniel Hernandez (INAPESCA) and John Barnes (OSU) weigh and measure Jack Mackerel (left), and Brittany Schwartzkopf and Lauren Martin (SWFSC) and Blane Bellerud (WCR) collect sardine ovary samples (right).

As Lasker rounded Cape Mendocino, the sea-surface temperature rose from ~11 to ~16 ᵒC, signaling the crossing of a biogeographical boundary. Aboard F/V Lisa Marie, as they sampled nearshore just south of Cape Mendocino, their catches began to include almost exclusively northern anchovy.
 
On Thursday, August 5, Dave Murfin prepared the echosounder system for Fishing Vessel Long Beach Carnage and Steve Sessions facilitated a transfer of the equipment at SWFSC to Captain Richie Ashley.

Aboard Lasker, wind was in the mid 20 kts towards the western end of the transect and the seas were reasonable for trawling. Close to shore, the weather was good too. One trawl was conducted nearshore, resulting in a large catch of northern anchovy.

An estimated 25,000 northern anchovy caught nearshore in one nighttime trawl, on August 5.
An estimated 25,000 northern anchovy caught nearshore in one nighttime trawl, on August 5.

F/V Lisa Marie concluded sampling on transect 231, three transects and ~15 nmi north of Bodega Bay. Captain Ricky Blair determined that sets could not be made in the high winds and seas they were encountering, the bad weather was expected to continue, and the survey window was coming to an end. With those considerations and safety in mind, he turned the boat north to disembark the scientists at Newport, Oregon. WDFW scientist Patrick Biondo reported, “It was absolutely nautical out there, no way we were setting any nets once the weather came in hard.”

NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker and F/V Lisa Marie encountered high winds and seas as they sampled in the area near Point Arenas. Calmer conditions nearshore allowed Lasker to conduct one nighttime trawl on August 5. F/V Lisa Marie stopped three transects short of Bodega Bay and headed to Newport, Oregon.
NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker and F/V Lisa Marie encountered high winds and seas as they sampled in the area near Point Arenas. Calmer conditions nearshore allowed Lasker to conduct one nighttime trawl on August 5. F/V Lisa Marie stopped three transects short of Bodega Bay and headed to Newport, Oregon.
Following a night with conditions too rough for Lasker to trawl more than once, and rough enough for F/V Lisa Marie to break sampling and run to Newport, Oregon, calm weather and sunny skies greeted those aboard Lasker, off Point Delgada, California.
Following a night with conditions too rough for Lasker to trawl more than once, and rough enough for F/V Lisa Marie to break sampling and run to Newport, Oregon, calm weather and sunny skies greeted those aboard Lasker, off Point Delgada, California.
Maps of Saildrone tracklines (left), Lasker’s completed transects with 38 kHz integrated volume backscattering strength attributed to CPS (middle), and species proportions in Lasker’s nighttime trawl catches (right).
Maps of Saildrone tracklines (left), Lasker’s completed transects with 38 kHz integrated volume backscattering strength attributed to CPS (middle), and species proportions in Lasker’s nighttime trawl catches (right).

By Friday, August 6, the CPS backscatter continued to be mapped on the shelf, close to shore. South of Cape Mendocino, however, a different biogeographical area was sampled -- the warmer water, circa 16 ᵒC, corresponded with nearshore and offshore catches dominated by northern anchovy.

Captain Ashley and his crew installed the pole-mount transducers on F/V Long Beach Carnage. Josiah Renfree is scheduled to set up and test the system on Monday, August 9, before the boat transits north to begin nearshore sampling at Bodega Bay, California. Lasker is expected to complete transects to the area between Monterey Bay and Morro Bay by the time she concludes sampling and heads to port in San Diego on August 14.

July 30, 2021
On Tuesday, July 27, Leg II of the Summer 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey commenced with NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker’s departure from Newport, Oregon, at 4:20 PM. The ship transited smoothly southward, encountering light wind, small seas and fog, to the first trawl location, approximately 10 nmi from the western waypoint on Transect 106. Conditions are expected to remain good at least until late in the weekend.

View of back of vessel as it departs the dock.
NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker departing Newport, Oregon, in the afternoon sunshine on July 27. Departure was again delayed, this time by two days due to provisioning mishaps and the unusual combination of strong wind and fog.

The Leg II science complement is led by Bill Watson (Chief Scientist and Lead CUFES Biologist, SWFSC) and includes Scott Mau (Lead Acoustician, SWFSC), Emma Perez (Acoustician, INAPESCA), Shannon Dolan (Acoustician, Doris Duke Foundation Intern), Brittany Schwartzkopf (Lead Trawl Biologist, SWFSC), Lauren Martin (Trawl Biologist, SWFSC), Blane Bellerud (Trawl Biologist; WCR), Daniel Hernandez (INAPESCA), John Barnes (Trawl Biologist, OSU), and Megan Human (CUFES Biologist; SWFSC). The two collaborating scientists from INAPESCA were welcomed aboard, fit with safety gear, and trained on protocols. Special thanks go to Brittany Schwartzkopf and Scott Mau for swiftly integrating our Mexican colleagues into the trawl and acoustic teams.

On Wednesday, July 28, the trawl was set at approximately 2:30 AM and the catch yielded mostly jack mackerel, as well as myctophids and squid. With the first transect completed midday, Scott Mau and Shannon Dolan processed the echograms and mapped CPS schools to direct the nighttime trawl locations. On the shoreward third of transect 106, sea-surface temperature (SST) was mostly below 9 ᵒC, indicating strong upwelling. Farther offshore, SST was greater than 13 ᵒC, where Megan Human observed enough sardine eggs to trigger adaptive sampling. This raised hopes that catches in the area would include sardine from the northern sub-population.

In left picture, Bill Watson inspects the first catch of Leg II, providing guidance on the identifications of myctophids, squids. On right, Daniel Hernandez sorts and measures the catch, mostly Jack Mackerel.
Bill Watson inspects the first catch of Leg II, providing guidance on the identifications of myctophids, squids. Daniel Hernandez sorts and measures the catch, mostly jack mackerel.

Meanwhile, two Saildrones worked in tandem to acoustically sample transects off Washington and Oregon. The offshore Saildrone moved consistently faster, due to stronger winds, and therefore covered most of the transects. Closer to shore, light winds and kelp have challenged the Saildrone’s ability to keep pace with both the offshore Saildrone and Lasker while following the prescribed transects within the allowable tolerance.

Map of West Coast depicting transect lines
Planned transects (yellow) and actual tracklines (grey) for two Saildrones working in tandem off Washington and Oregon, the expected domain of the northern subpopulation of northern anchovy. Nearshore transect (purple) are being sampled with an echosounder and purse-seine net, by fishing vessel Lisa Marie. The balloons indicate the locations of the two Saildrones and Reuben Lasker on Tuesday July 27.

After spending a couple days in port at Newport, Oregon, FV Lisa Marie continued sampling the nearshore transect near Nesika Beach, Oregon, roughly 10 nmi north of the Rogue River mouth. The wind and waves did not allow sets on Wednesday or Thursday, July 28 and 29, but no CPS schools were seen on the echosounder either.

On Thursday and Friday, July 29 and 30, Lasker sampled transects near the Oregon-California border. A coastal, 20 to 30 nm-wide band of water with SST < 10 C included jack mackerel and pacific herring, species that can tolerate colder temperatures. Some sardine eggs and CPS echoes were observed in the warmer water farther offshore.

Map of West Coast depicting sea surface temperature
Sea-surface-temperature (SST) shows a wide band of cold water near the coast off southern Oregon and northern California that is relatively void of CPS.

As Lasker approaches the Oregon-California border on Friday July 30, up-to-date maps of CPS backscatter, eggs and catch highlight an effect of coastal upwelling on the CPS distributions. With an exception in and around the Columbia River plume where northern anchovy were observed, mostly pacific herring and jack mackerel are in the colder water closer to the shore, and small pockets of spawning Pacific sardine are observed in warmer water farther from the coast.

Three maps of the West Coast depicting integrated 38-kHz backscatter from CPS (a), CPS eggs (b), and proportions of species in the nighttime catch clusters (c).
Maps of integrated 38-kHz backscatter from CPS (a), CPS eggs (b), and proportions of species in the nighttime catch clusters (c).

Maps of integrated 38-kHz backscatter from CPS (a), CPS eggs (b), and proportions of species in the nighttime catch clusters (c).

July 23, 2021

On Thursday, July 22, NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker called at Newport, OR, completing the first leg of the Summer 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey. Transects have been completed between the southern end of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and Cape Blanco, OR (Fig. 1). Meanwhile, two Saildrones continue to work in tandem to complete interstitial transects in this area, one sampling the offshore two-thirds of each transect and the other sampling the one-third closer to shore. Fishing vessel Lisa Marie sampled waters too shallow for Lasker to navigate, and has completed transects to ~20 nmi south of Coos Bay, OR. Lisa Marie will also call at Newport for a couple days respite and a change in the science party.

Three maps of U.S. West coast depicting integrated volume backscatter, fish egg densities samples, and fish species caught in trawls.
Figure 1. Preliminary, unverified data from Leg I including (a) integrated volume backscatter attributed to CPS measured with a 38 kHz echosounder; (b) fish egg densities sampled with the Continuous Underway Fish-Egg Sampler (CUFES); and (c) fish species caught in the nighttime trawls.

Along the coast in the sampled area, upwelling reduced the water temperature and increased primary production, increasing chlorophyll concentration, and reducing and positioning the potential sardine habitat offshore (Fig. 2). Acoustic backscatter attributed to coastal pelagic fish species (CPS) was observed principally in these upwelled areas. Nighttime catches aboard Lasker identified these CPS as mostly Pacific herring in the area between the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Columbia River, and jack mackerel off Oregon (Fig. 1). Additionally, northern anchovy from the northern subpopulation were observed in the area between the Columbia River and Newport, and Pacific sardine were caught between Newport and Cape Blanco, near Coos Bay (Fig. 1). Purse-seine catches from Lisa Marie tended to be small and varied, notably including two catches of squid and one catch with one sardine.

Three maps of the U.S. West Coast showing sardine potential habitat, sea surface temperature, and chlorophyll concentration
Figure 2. Potential habitat for the northern subpopulation of Pacific sardine (left); sea-surface temperature (SST; middle); and chlorophyll concentration (CHL; right). Ninety percent of historical sardine observations were contained in water with 11.5 ≤ SST ≤ 15.5 °C and 0.18 ≤ CHL ≤ 3.2 mg/m3, between oligotrophic oceanic and freshly upwelled waters. (Images from coastwatch.pfeg.noaa.gov/erddap).

The officers and crew of Lasker, and the complement of scientists, are recognized for their commitment and sacrifice to successfully complete Leg I of the Summer 2021 CCE Survey during the COVID-19 pandemic. Special thanks go to Josiah Renfree (Chief Scientist), Gabriel Johnson (Acoustician), Matthew Craig (Trawl Lead), Peter Kuriyama (Trawl Biologist), Liana Heberer (Trawl Biologist), Scarlett Hensman (Trawl Biologist), Emily Gardner (CUFES Lead), and Anne Freire de Carvalho (CUFES Biologist).

Lasker will depart Newport, commencing Leg II, on Sunday, July 25. Bill Watson will be Chief Scientist. Sampling will resume at Cape Blanco and is expected to continue south to the area between Monterey and Morro Bay by the end of the leg. The next port call, at San Diego, will be August 15 to September 1. 
 

July 15, 2021

After departing San Diego on July 6, four days later than planned, NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker encountered high seas and headwinds, which followed her northward and slowed her transit. After losing an additional two days to weather, a decision was made to cancel sampling off Vancouver Island. On July 12, Lasker began transects off Cape Flattery, WA, focusing effort on stocks of anchovy and sardine, and mackerels. In the area where the northern stock of Northern anchovy is expected, off Washington and Oregon, Lasker’s sampling is being augmented by sampling from two Saildrones. Also, beginning on July 15, fishing vessel Lisa Marie began nearshore sampling with a 38 kHz echosounder and a purse-seine net. Thus far, Lasker’s samples show some CPS schools near the Strait of Juan de Fuca, mostly herring with some salmon. 

Map of Pacific West Coast. Acoustic backscatter from CPS mapped on the first three transects off Washington, beginning at Cape Flattery.
Preliminary, unverified acoustic backscatter from CPS mapped on the first three transects off Washington, beginning at Cape Flattery. 

July 9, 2021

On July 6, NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker sailed from Tenth Avenue Pier in San Diego, CA, marking the beginning of a 4-leg, 82-seadays, 3.5-month survey of coastal pelagic fishes in the California Current Ecosystem. This survey aims to assess the populations of sardine, anchovy, herring, and jack and Pacific mackerels in the survey area, between the north end of Vancouver Island and central Baja California. Sampling from Lasker will be augmented with data collected from Saildrones, fishing vessels Lisa Marie and Long Beach Carnage, and Mexican research vessel Dr. Jorge Carranza Fraser.

Four images of the Reuben Lasker, Lisa Marie, LB Carnage, and Fraser alongside map of western coast of California, split by leg.
The Summer 2021 California Current Ecosystem Survey will assess seven populations of five species of small pelagic fishes in the area from Vancouver Island to central Baja California. Sampling will be conducted from NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker, Saildrones, fishing vessels Lisa Marie and Long Beach Carnage, and Mexican research vessel Dr. Jorge Carranza Fraser.

On Tuesday, July 6, the scientific complement sailed for Leg I, including Josiah Renfree (Chief Scientist), Gabriel Johnson (Acoustics), Matt Craig (Trawl Lead), Peter Kuryama (Trawl), Liana Heberer (Trawl), Scarlett Heberer (Trawl), Emily Gardner (CUFES), and Anne Freire de Carvalho (CUFES). The ship left the pier at 10 am, stopped briefly at the sea buoy outside San Diego Bay, then calibrated the new Simrad EC150-3C, which is a combination wide-bandwidth echsosounder and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. The ADCP calibration involved four reciprocal transects. The echosounder was calibrated using the standard sphere method with the ship utilizing dynamic positioning. The ship then commenced a 5-day transit to the north end of Vancouver Island to begin the survey transects.

Wind map and weather forecast of the US West Coast
Large waves were encountered by NOAA Ship Reuben Lasker off Point Conception on July 7, the second day of a five-day transit to Vancouver Island where she will commence survey transects. Image from www.windy.com/

On Wednesday, July 7, high wind and waves off Point Conception (Fig. 2) made for a rough ride that is expected to persist for another day or two. The pump for the Continuous Underway Fish-Egg Sampler (CUFES) required repairs. That and the CUFES microscope work were impeded by the inclement weather.

Previous: 2019 California Current Ecosystem Survey

Last updated by Southwest Fisheries Science Center on September 22, 2021