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Celebrate National Native American Heritage Month

November 03, 2022

November is National Native American Heritage Month. Learn more about our colleagues and how they to contribute to NOAA Fisheries' mission.

Native American Eskimo and kayak Native American Eskimo and kayak. Credit: Fish and Wildlife Service/E.P. Haddon.

Join us in celebrating National Native American Heritage Month, as we recognize Native Americans' respect for natural resources and the Earth and honor native cultures. We celebrate the sacrifices, contributions, and achievements of Native American people and their beautiful culture. 

Explore the profiles below to learn more about what this month means to our colleagues and partners, and how they each help contribute to our mission.

Features

Meet Mabel Baldwin-Schaeffer, Tribal Research Coordinator

As a Tribal Research Coordinator at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Mabel Baldwin-Schaeffer works to promote awareness of valuable Alaskan resources and the importance of food sovereignty and food security. She grew up in the Native Village of Kiana, Alaska, and has a Master of Science, Environmental Science from the Alaska Pacific University, Anchorage, Alaska.

Learn more about Mabel Baldwin-Schaeffer and her work

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Mabel Baldwin-Schaeffer on boat.
Mabel Baldwin-Schaeffer on boat. Photo courtesy of Mabel Baldwin-Schaeffer.

Meet Geri Stoll, Permit Assistant

As a Permit Assistant for the Alaska Regional Office, Geri Stoll issues certificates, licenses and permits for halibut subsistence, and commercial fishing for the Alaska crab fishery and for halibut/sablefish. Outside of work, Geri loves to explore the beaches around Juneau and the Pacific Northwest. She also loves to promote and share her heritage, and the culture of the rest of her "cousins" (other tribal citizens).

Learn more about Geri Stoll and her work

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Geri Stoll stands in an office wearing a native robe and headdress.
Geri Stoll. Photo courtesy of Geri Stoll.

Sound Bytes: What We Can Learn From How Indigenous Peoples Listen

A day at sea with members of the Northern Chumash Tribal Council and the Hispanic Access Foundation.

What we can learn from how Indigenous peoples listen

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Felipe J. Villegas, Violet Sage Walker and Juan Rosas stand on the bow of the R/V Fulmar during the CCC 2022 Cruise. They are all facing the camera and smiling.
From left to right: Felipe J. Villegas, Violet Sage Walker and Juan Rosas stand on the bow of the R/V Fulmar during the CCC 2022 Cruise. Credit: NOAA Fisheries / Cory Hom-Weaver.

Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) Joins Marine Mammal Stranding Network

NOAA is excited to welcome the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) to the Greater Atlantic Regional Marine Mammal Stranding Network!

Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) joins Marine Mammal Stranding Network

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A view of the cliffs of Aquinnah and Gay Head Light, Martha's Vineyard
A view of the cliffs of Aquinnah and Gay Head Light, Martha's Vineyard. Photo Credit: NOAA Fisheries

The 7 R’s of Integrating Tribal and Indigenous Partnerships into Aquaculture Literacy

Aquaculture, the fastest growing form of agriculture in the world, has the potential to create jobs, support resilient working waterfronts and coastal communities, and sustainably produce healthy food. As U.S. aquaculture grows, aquaculture resource managers and their partners have the opportunity to shape a community that is diverse, inclusive, and accessible. Integrating perspectives from tribal and Indigenous groups who have important histories and expertise with aquaculture is a critical step of this process.

Integrating tribal and Indigenous partnerships into aquaculture literacy

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Visitors gather with community members at a Hawaiian loko iʻa (fishpond) to learn about Native fishpond aquaculture and restoration
Visitors gather with community members at a Hawaiian loko iʻa (fishpond) to learn about Native fishpond aquaculture and restoration. Credit: Lindsey Pierce/Environmental Specialist at the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska.

Aquaculture Holds Connection and Resilience Opportunities for Skokomish Tribal Communities

The Skokomish Tribe practice aquaculture for economic diversity, climate resilience, and the maintenance of cultural roots.

Aquaculture holds connection and resilience opportunities for Skokomish Tribal communities

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Blair Paul and two colleagues stand in front of derelict nets prior following a beach clean up.
Blair Paul, Jeff Moore, and Skokomish tribal member Josh Hermann stand on a beach following removal of derelict nets prior to clam seeding for tribal harvest. Photo courtesy of: Chris Eardley

Last updated by Office of Communications on November 04, 2022

Diversity and Inclusion